Documents: 123, displayed: 101 - 120

All Libraries and Collections

Preview Page
Zürich, Braginsky Collection, B222
Parchment · 129 ff. · 12 x 8.1 cm · [Vienna/Amsterdam?] copied and decorated by Moses Judah Leib ben Wolf Broda of Trebitsch · 1723
Tehillim (Psalms)

e-codices · 09/21/2016, 15:19:23
Although Moses Judah Leib ben Wolf Broda is the artist responsible for perhaps the most famous decorated Hebrew manuscript of the eighteenth century – the Von Geldern Haggadah of 1723, which may have been a source of inspiration for the Haggadah described in Heinrich Heine’s Der Rabbi von Bacherach – hardly anything is known about his life. He was born in the Moravian town of Trebitsch (now Trebic, Czech Republic), where the first scribe of the eighteenth-century school, Aryeh ben Judah Leib, originated as well. Including the Braginksy psalter a total of seven manuscripts by Moses Judah Leib are known, produced between 1713 and 1723.
The manuscript has an architectural title page with Moses and Aaron standing in arches. The psalms are subdivided according to the days of the week on which they are to be read and, with the exception of the psalms for Friday, these daily sections have decorated monochrome or multicolored initial word panels. Following the first word of Psalms 1, ashre, on folio 6r, is a depiction of King David sitting outside on the terrace of a palace. He plays the harp while looking at an open volume, possibly his psalms. Moses Judah Leib was perhaps the most accomplished painter among his contemporaries. Two of his most famous Haggadot, the Second Cincinnati Haggadah (Cincinnati, Klau Library, Hebrew Union College, MS 444,1) and the Von Geldern Haggadah (private collection), contain full-page seder scenes that stand out as highlights of eighteenth-century Jewish pictorial art.
The binding of the manuscript has the emblem of the De Pinto family of Amsterdam tooled in gold on the front and back covers. The De Pinto family fled Antwerp for Rotterdam in 1646, to return to Judaism officially and to profit from Holland’s international trade network. In the catalogue of the auction at which this manuscript was acquired for the Braginsky Collection, mention is made of a De Pinto family legend in which the artist was invited to Amsterdam to come and write the psalms for the family. This may indicate that one of the most accomplished eighteenth-century scribe-artists attracted an international clientele.

A Journey through Jewish Worlds. Highlights from the Braginsky collection of Hebrew manuscripts and printed books, hrsg. E. M. Cohen, S. L. Mintz, E. G. L. Schrijver, Amsterdam, 2009, p. 114.
Go to Annotations

Online Since: 10/13/2016

Preview Page
Zürich, Braginsky Collection, B235
Parchment · 24 ff. · 14.4 x 90 cm · Pressburg, Judah Leib ben Meir of Glogau · 1730
Tefillot Yom Kippur Katan ("Prayers for the Minor Day of Atonement"), with Yiddish translation

e-codices · 01/15/2015, 15:25:08
In biblical times Rosh Hodesh, the first day of the lunar month, was a day on which work was not allowed and important events took place. The prohibition against work was lifted in Talmudic times; since then Rosh Hodesh has been considered a minor festival.
At the end of the sixteenth century a custom developed among the mystics of Safed, in the Land of Israel, to fast on the day preceding Rosh Hodesh. A new liturgy was developed, based on penitential prayers for Yom Kippur. This fast was called Yom Kippur Katan, or the Minor Day of Atonement. In the course of the seventeenth century the custom spread to Italy and on to Northern Europe.
Manuscripts for Yom Kippur Katan, in vogue in the eighteenth century, included few illustrations. The Braginsky manuscript has only a baroque architectural title page with depictions of Moses and Aaron. The name of the owner was intended to be added to the empty shield at the top. The city of Pressburg and name of the scribe, Judah Leib ben Meir of Glogau (Silesia, Western Poland), are noted. No other manuscripts by him are known.
The script in this manuscript is similar to that of the famous scribe-artist Aaron Wolf Herlingen of Gewitsch. Moreover, the title page is strongly reminiscent of his works. If Judah Leib’s signature were not present, this manuscript almost certainly would have been attributed to Herlingen. It is possible that Judah Leib bought an illustrated title page from Herlingen that was devoid of text. This would explain the presence of the empty shield and the fact that the title page is bound into the manuscript as a separate leaf. Another explanation may be considered as well. In a 1736 census mention is made of an unknown assistant living in Herlingen’s house in Pressburg (see cat. no. 39). Perhaps Judah Leib was Herlingen’s assistant. If this is true, existing attributions of unsigned works to Herlingen based only on images that appear in the manuscripts should be carefully reconsidered, as this evidence may be insufficient.

From: A Journey through Jewish Worlds. Highlights from the Braginsky collection of Hebrew manuscripts and printed books, hrsg. E. M. Cohen, S. L. Mintz, E. G. L. Schrijver, Amsterdam, 2009, p. 120.
Go to Annotations

Online Since: 03/19/2015

Preview Page
Zürich, Braginsky Collection, B235
Parchment · 24 ff. · 14.4 x 90 cm · Pressburg, Judah Leib ben Meir of Glogau · 1730
Tefillot Yom Kippur Katan ("Prayers for the Minor Day of Atonement"), with Yiddish translation

e-codices · 01/15/2015, 15:44:59
In biblischen Zeiten war Rosch chodesch, der Tag des Erscheinens des Neumonds, ein Feiertag, an dem nicht gearbeitet werden durfte. Dieses Verbot wurde während der Kompilation des Talmuds aufgehoben. Seither gilt Rosch chodesch als sogenannter Halbfeiertag. Im 16. Jahrhundert begannen die Mystiker von Safed in Obergaliläa, am Tag vor Rosch chodesch zu fasten. Dafür wurde eine an den Bussgebeten von Jom Kippur (Versöhnungstag) orientierte Liturgie entwickelt, weshalb dieser Fasttag die Bezeichnung Jom kippur katan (Kleiner Versöhnungstag) erhielt. Bald breitete sich der Brauch auch nach Italien und in die Länder nördlich der Alpen aus.
Im 18. Jahrhundert erfreuten sich Handschriften für Jom kippur katan sehr grosser Beliebtheit, waren jedoch selten illustriert. Beim Exemplar der Braginsky Collection ist lediglich die Titelseite geschmückt mit einem barocken Architekturrahmen und den Figuren Moses und Aaron. Das ursprünglich wohl für den Namen des Besitzers vorgesehene Oval in der Rocaille über dem Architrav blieb frei. In der Titelinschrift findet sich jedoch der Name des Schreibers sowie die Jahreszahl und der Ort der Herstellung: Juda Leib ben Meir aus Glogau (Schlesien), Pressburg 1730.
Von diesem Kopisten ist kein weiteres Manuskript bekannt, aber Schrift und Illustration der Titelseite weisen alle Merkmale des Stils von Aaron Wolf Herlingen aus Gewitsch auf. Wäre Juda Leib als Schreiber nicht erwähnt, würde man dieses Manuskript bestimmt Herlingen zuschreiben. Möglicherweise erwarb Juda Leib eine von Herlingen illustrierte Titelseite ohne Texteintrag und integrierte sie in sein Buch. Das würde das leere Textfeld ebenso erklären wie die Tatsache, dass die Titelseite als separates Blatt in die Handschrift eingebunden ist. Zudem ist ein Eintrag in einem Pressburger Census von 1736 bekannt, der einen nicht namentlich genannten famulus (Gehilfen) in Herlingens Haushalt erwähnt. Ist dieser mit Juda Leib gleichzusetzen, wäre die Herkunft des Titelblatts geklärt.

Aus: Schöne Seiten. Jüdische Schriftkultur aus der Braginsky Collection, Hrsg. von Emile Schrijver und Falk Wiesemann, Zürich 2011, S. 102.
Go to Annotations

Online Since: 03/19/2015

Preview Page
Zürich, Braginsky Collection, B242
Parchment · 164 ff. · 20 x 15.4 cm · Worms, Juspa shammes · [17th century]
Juspa (Jousep), Sefer Likkutei Yosef ("Joseph’s Compilation")

e-codices · 01/15/2015, 16:05:40
One of the oldest and most important Jewish communities in Europe was in Worms. It was the site of the rabbinic and scholarly activities of many great Jewish leaders, first and foremost among them Rashi. The scholarship and ancient traditions characteristic of the Jewish community in Worms are reflected in the minhagim (customs) that Juspa, the author of this volume, and others recorded and preserved. These customs reflect Jewish life in the synagogue and the home throughout the entire year. In minute detail and with close attention to all manifestations of religious behavior, both public and private, the ways of everyday life are revealed in Juspa’s works.
Juspa was born in Fulda in 1604 and died in Worms in 1678. He was a student of Elijah Loanz, the Ba’al Shem of Worms (cat. no. 27). As shammes, Juspa served the Worms community in many capacities, including those of scribe, notary, trustee, mohel, and cantor. He was a talented writer and compiler; he paid special attention to the music of the synagogue and also composed poems. Juspa’s works are a mine of information on the Jewry of Worms and beyond. He wrote the Wormser Minhagbuch and Ma’aseh Nissim, in which he retold stories of Worms Jewry as recounted by the elders of the community. In addition he authored Sefer Likkutei Yosef, displayed here.
Previously in the Schocken Library in Jerusalem, this autograph manuscript contains later ownership entries, including testimony that the manuscript served as a pledge that was redeemed in 1782 by Rabbi Michael Scheyer. The original text includes commentaries on the prayer book, the Grace after Meals, the Passover Haggadah, and the Sayings of the Fathers, interspersed with records of prayer-related customs and autobiographical remarks. The comments on minhagim were incorporated into the printed edition of the Wormser Minhagbuch, but the bulk of the manuscript remains unpublished. This carefully written codex therefore serves as a primary source for the religious history of one of the most significant Jewish communities in Europe.

From: A Journey through Jewish Worlds. Highlights from the Braginsky collection of Hebrew manuscripts and printed books, hrsg. E. M. Cohen, S. L. Mintz, E. G. L. Schrijver, Amsterdam, 2009, S. 90.
Go to Annotations

Online Since: 03/19/2015

Preview Page
Zürich, Braginsky Collection, B243 Vol. 1
Parchment · 270 ff. · 32.2 x 26.3 · Evora (Portugal), copied and vocalized by Isaac ben Ishai Sason · 1494
Hebrew Bible

e-codices · 01/20/2015, 08:30:09
In the eighteenth century, this Hebrew Bible with Masorah Magna and Parva was housed in the library of the Convent of the Discalced Carmelites of S. Paolo in Florence. After that library was sacked by Napoleonic forces, the manuscript may have been in the Vatican Library for a short while; the only source for this information is an English auction catalogue of 1827 in which the manuscript appeared. It remained in England until it was acquired from the library of the bibliophile Beriah Botfield for the Braginsky Collection.
Although the manuscript was bound into four volumes in England during the nineteenth century, the original consisted of two parts, each with its own colophon. The first part comprised the Pentateuch and the Hagiographa, while the second contained all the books of the Prophets. At the end of the original second volume, now the fourth volume (page 73), the scribe and vocalizer Isaac ben Ishai Sason stated that he finished copying the manuscript in 1491 in Ocaña, in Castile. At the end of the original first volume, now the second volume, he wrote a colophon with another year of completion, 1494 (page 71).
This appears within a detailed interlaced frame with pen flourishes along the outer and part of the inner borders. He finished this part, however, in Evora, in the Kingdom of Portugal. With his fellow Jews Isaac had been expelled from Spain in 1492 and forced to flee to Portugal, where he copied the Pentateuch and Hagiographa. In the latter colophon the scribe even indicated that it had been two years since the expulsion from Castile. Whether he did indeed copy the manuscript in this unusual order, first Prophets, then Pentateuch and Hagiographa, or whether an original first part got lost as a result of the expulsion, necessitating its replacement, cannot be known.
According to tradition, the text of the Song of Moses, (Ha'azinu) Deuteronomy 32:1–43 (page 74), is ar- ranged as two columns composed of bricks placed one above the other. The vertical arrangement of the Masorah Magna on either side of the single column of text of the end of the chapter that precedes the song, displays Isaac ben Ishai Sason’s keen artistic sensibility.

From: A Journey through Jewish Worlds. Highlights from the Braginsky collection of Hebrew manuscripts and printed books, hrsg. E. M. Cohen, S. L. Mintz, E. G. L. Schrijver, Amsterdam, 2009, p. 70.
Go to Annotations

Online Since: 12/17/2015

Preview Page
Zürich, Braginsky Collection, B243 Vol. 1
Parchment · 270 ff. · 32.2 x 26.3 · Evora (Portugal), copied and vocalized by Isaac ben Ishai Sason · 1494
Hebrew Bible

e-codices · 01/20/2015, 08:46:51
Im 18. Jahrhundert befand sich diese hebräische Bibel mit masoretischen (textkritischen) Anmerkungen in der Bibliothek des Klosters S. Paolo dei Carmelitani Scalzi in Florenz. Nach der Plünderung des Klosters durch napoleonische Truppen dürfte die Handschrift in die Vatikanische Bibliothek gelangt sein, wie aus einem Eintrag in einem englischen Auktionskatalog von 1827 hervorgeht. Sie blieb in England, bis sie aus der Sammlung des Bibliophilen Beriah Botfield für die Braginsky Collection erworben wurde.
Die ursprünglich zweibändige Handschrift wurde im 19. Jahrhundert neu in vier Bänden gebunden. Der erste Teil umfasste zuvor den Pentateuch und die Hagiografen (die «poetischen» und «historischen» Schriften sowie die fünf Rollen), der zweite Teil enthielt die prophetischen Schriften. Am Schluss des zweiten und heute vierten Bandes notierte der Schreiber Isaak ben Ischai Sason, der auch die Vokalisierungen vorgenommen hatte, er habe das Manuskript im Jahr 1491 in der kastilischen Stadt Ocaña beendet. Am Schluss des ursprünglich ersten und heute zweiten Bandes befindet sich ein weiteres Kolophon, das von einem Schmuckrahmen mit verschlungenen Bandornamenten umschlossen ist. Dieses gibt an, die Handschrift sei 1494 in Evora im Königreich Portugal fertiggestellt worden, zwei Jahre nach der Vertreibung der Juden aus dem spanischen Kastilien. Es mag irritieren, dass Isaak ben Ischai Sason die beiden Teile nicht in der kanonischen Abfolge der biblischen Bücher geschrieben haben soll. Möglicherweise ging der Pentateuch-Teil bei der Vertreibung verloren und musste deshalb ein zweites Mal abgeschrieben werden.
Der kalligrafischen Tradition entsprechend, sind die Wörter des Liedes des Mose (Deuteronomium 32:1–43) in zwei Kolumnen wie übereinandergeschichtete Ziegelsteine arrangiert. Die vertikale Anordnung der Masora magna zu beiden Seiten der Schlusspartie des vorangehenden Textes zeugt von der einfühlsamen Fertigkeit dieses jüdischen Schriftkünstlers.

Aus: Schöne Seiten. Jüdische Schriftkultur aus der Braginsky Collection, Hrsg. von Emile Schrijver und Falk Wiesemann, Zürich 2011, S. 238.
Go to Annotations

Online Since: 12/17/2015

Preview Page
Zürich, Braginsky Collection, B243 Vol. 2
Parchment · 182 ff. · 32.2 x 26.3 · Evora (Portugal), copied and vocalized by Isaac ben Ishai Sason · 1494
Hebrew Bible

e-codices · 05/21/2015, 14:51:51
Im 18. Jahrhundert befand sich diese hebräische Bibel mit masoretischen (textkritischen) Anmerkungen in der Bibliothek des Klosters S. Paolo dei Carmelitani Scalzi in Florenz. Nach der Plünderung des Klosters durch napoleonische Truppen dürfte die Handschrift in die Vatikanische Bibliothek gelangt sein, wie aus einem Eintrag in einem englischen Auktionskatalog von 1827 hervorgeht. Sie blieb in England, bis sie aus der Sammlung des Bibliophilen Beriah Botfield für die Braginsky Collection erworben wurde.
Die ursprünglich zweibändige Handschrift wurde im 19. Jahrhundert neu in vier Bänden gebunden. Der erste Teil umfasste zuvor den Pentateuch und die Hagiografen (die «poetischen» und «historischen» Schriften sowie die fünf Rollen), der zweite Teil enthielt die prophetischen Schriften. Am Schluss des zweiten und heute vierten Bandes notierte der Schreiber Isaak ben Ischai Sason, der auch die Vokalisierungen vorgenommen hatte, er habe das Manuskript im Jahr 1491 in der kastilischen Stadt Ocaña beendet. Am Schluss des ursprünglich ersten und heute zweiten Bandes befindet sich ein weiteres Kolophon, das von einem Schmuckrahmen mit verschlungenen Bandornamenten umschlossen ist. Dieses gibt an, die Handschrift sei 1494 in Evora im Königreich Portugal fertiggestellt worden, zwei Jahre nach der Vertreibung der Juden aus dem spanischen Kastilien. Es mag irritieren, dass Isaak ben Ischai Sason die beiden Teile nicht in der kanonischen Abfolge der biblischen Bücher geschrieben haben soll. Möglicherweise ging der Pentateuch-Teil bei der Vertreibung verloren und musste deshalb ein zweites Mal abgeschrieben werden.
Der kalligrafischen Tradition entsprechend, sind die Wörter des Liedes des Mose (Deuteronomium 32:1–43) in zwei Kolumnen wie übereinandergeschichtete Ziegelsteine arrangiert. Die vertikale Anordnung der Masora magna zu beiden Seiten der Schlusspartie des vorangehenden Textes zeugt von der einfühlsamen Fertigkeit dieses jüdischen Schriftkünstlers.

Aus: Schöne Seiten. Jüdische Schriftkultur aus der Braginsky Collection, Hrsg. von Emile Schrijver und Falk Wiesemann, Zürich 2011, S. 238.
Go to Annotations

Online Since: 12/17/2015

Preview Page
Zürich, Braginsky Collection, B243 Vol. 2
Parchment · 182 ff. · 32.2 x 26.3 · Evora (Portugal), copied and vocalized by Isaac ben Ishai Sason · 1494
Hebrew Bible

e-codices · 05/21/2015, 14:52:23
In the eighteenth century, this Hebrew Bible with Masorah Magna and Parva was housed in the library of the Convent of the Discalced Carmelites of S. Paolo in Florence. After that library was sacked by Napoleonic forces, the manuscript may have been in the Vatican Library for a short while; the only source for this information is an English auction catalogue of 1827 in which the manuscript appeared. It remained in England until it was acquired from the library of the bibliophile Beriah Botfield for the Braginsky Collection.
Although the manuscript was bound into four volumes in England during the nineteenth century, the original consisted of two parts, each with its own colophon. The first part comprised the Pentateuch and the Hagiographa, while the second contained all the books of the Prophets. At the end of the original second volume, now the fourth volume (page 73), the scribe and vocalizer Isaac ben Ishai Sason stated that he finished copying the manuscript in 1491 in Ocaña, in Castile. At the end of the original first volume, now the second volume, he wrote a colophon with another year of completion, 1494 (page 71).
This appears within a detailed interlaced frame with pen flourishes along the outer and part of the inner borders. He finished this part, however, in Evora, in the Kingdom of Portugal. With his fellow Jews Isaac had been expelled from Spain in 1492 and forced to flee to Portugal, where he copied the Pentateuch and Hagiographa. In the latter colophon the scribe even indicated that it had been two years since the expulsion from Castile. Whether he did indeed copy the manuscript in this unusual order, first Prophets, then Pentateuch and Hagiographa, or whether an original first part got lost as a result of the expulsion, necessitating its replacement, cannot be known.
According to tradition, the text of the Song of Moses, (Ha'azinu) Deuteronomy 32:1–43 (page 74), is ar- ranged as two columns composed of bricks placed one above the other. The vertical arrangement of the Masorah Magna on either side of the single column of text of the end of the chapter that precedes the song, displays Isaac ben Ishai Sason’s keen artistic sensibility.

From: A Journey through Jewish Worlds. Highlights from the Braginsky collection of Hebrew manuscripts and printed books, hrsg. E. M. Cohen, S. L. Mintz, E. G. L. Schrijver, Amsterdam, 2009, p. 70.
Go to Annotations

Online Since: 12/17/2015

Preview Page
Zürich, Braginsky Collection, B243 Vol. 3
Parchment · 184 ff. · 32.2 x 26.3 · Ocaña (Spain), copied and vocalized by Isaac ben Ishai Sason · 1491
Hebrew Bible

e-codices · 05/21/2015, 14:54:46
Im 18. Jahrhundert befand sich diese hebräische Bibel mit masoretischen (textkritischen) Anmerkungen in der Bibliothek des Klosters S. Paolo dei Carmelitani Scalzi in Florenz. Nach der Plünderung des Klosters durch napoleonische Truppen dürfte die Handschrift in die Vatikanische Bibliothek gelangt sein, wie aus einem Eintrag in einem englischen Auktionskatalog von 1827 hervorgeht. Sie blieb in England, bis sie aus der Sammlung des Bibliophilen Beriah Botfield für die Braginsky Collection erworben wurde.
Die ursprünglich zweibändige Handschrift wurde im 19. Jahrhundert neu in vier Bänden gebunden. Der erste Teil umfasste zuvor den Pentateuch und die Hagiografen (die «poetischen» und «historischen» Schriften sowie die fünf Rollen), der zweite Teil enthielt die prophetischen Schriften. Am Schluss des zweiten und heute vierten Bandes notierte der Schreiber Isaak ben Ischai Sason, der auch die Vokalisierungen vorgenommen hatte, er habe das Manuskript im Jahr 1491 in der kastilischen Stadt Ocaña beendet. Am Schluss des ursprünglich ersten und heute zweiten Bandes befindet sich ein weiteres Kolophon, das von einem Schmuckrahmen mit verschlungenen Bandornamenten umschlossen ist. Dieses gibt an, die Handschrift sei 1494 in Evora im Königreich Portugal fertiggestellt worden, zwei Jahre nach der Vertreibung der Juden aus dem spanischen Kastilien. Es mag irritieren, dass Isaak ben Ischai Sason die beiden Teile nicht in der kanonischen Abfolge der biblischen Bücher geschrieben haben soll. Möglicherweise ging der Pentateuch-Teil bei der Vertreibung verloren und musste deshalb ein zweites Mal abgeschrieben werden.
Der kalligrafischen Tradition entsprechend, sind die Wörter des Liedes des Mose (Deuteronomium 32:1–43) in zwei Kolumnen wie übereinandergeschichtete Ziegelsteine arrangiert. Die vertikale Anordnung der Masora magna zu beiden Seiten der Schlusspartie des vorangehenden Textes zeugt von der einfühlsamen Fertigkeit dieses jüdischen Schriftkünstlers.

Aus: Schöne Seiten. Jüdische Schriftkultur aus der Braginsky Collection, Hrsg. von Emile Schrijver und Falk Wiesemann, Zürich 2011, S. 238.
Go to Annotations

Online Since: 12/17/2015

Preview Page
Zürich, Braginsky Collection, B243 Vol. 3
Parchment · 184 ff. · 32.2 x 26.3 · Ocaña (Spain), copied and vocalized by Isaac ben Ishai Sason · 1491
Hebrew Bible

e-codices · 05/21/2015, 14:55:05
In the eighteenth century, this Hebrew Bible with Masorah Magna and Parva was housed in the library of the Convent of the Discalced Carmelites of S. Paolo in Florence. After that library was sacked by Napoleonic forces, the manuscript may have been in the Vatican Library for a short while; the only source for this information is an English auction catalogue of 1827 in which the manuscript appeared. It remained in England until it was acquired from the library of the bibliophile Beriah Botfield for the Braginsky Collection.
Although the manuscript was bound into four volumes in England during the nineteenth century, the original consisted of two parts, each with its own colophon. The first part comprised the Pentateuch and the Hagiographa, while the second contained all the books of the Prophets. At the end of the original second volume, now the fourth volume (page 73), the scribe and vocalizer Isaac ben Ishai Sason stated that he finished copying the manuscript in 1491 in Ocaña, in Castile. At the end of the original first volume, now the second volume, he wrote a colophon with another year of completion, 1494 (page 71).
This appears within a detailed interlaced frame with pen flourishes along the outer and part of the inner borders. He finished this part, however, in Evora, in the Kingdom of Portugal. With his fellow Jews Isaac had been expelled from Spain in 1492 and forced to flee to Portugal, where he copied the Pentateuch and Hagiographa. In the latter colophon the scribe even indicated that it had been two years since the expulsion from Castile. Whether he did indeed copy the manuscript in this unusual order, first Prophets, then Pentateuch and Hagiographa, or whether an original first part got lost as a result of the expulsion, necessitating its replacement, cannot be known.
According to tradition, the text of the Song of Moses, (Ha'azinu) Deuteronomy 32:1–43 (page 74), is ar- ranged as two columns composed of bricks placed one above the other. The vertical arrangement of the Masorah Magna on either side of the single column of text of the end of the chapter that precedes the song, displays Isaac ben Ishai Sason’s keen artistic sensibility.

From: A Journey through Jewish Worlds. Highlights from the Braginsky collection of Hebrew manuscripts and printed books, hrsg. E. M. Cohen, S. L. Mintz, E. G. L. Schrijver, Amsterdam, 2009, p. 70.
Go to Annotations

Online Since: 12/17/2015

Preview Page
Zürich, Braginsky Collection, B243 Vol. 4
Parchment · 193 ff. · 32.2 x 26.3 · Ocaña (Spain), copied and vocalized by Isaac ben Ishai Sason · 1491
Hebrew Bible

e-codices · 05/21/2015, 14:56:53
Im 18. Jahrhundert befand sich diese hebräische Bibel mit masoretischen (textkritischen) Anmerkungen in der Bibliothek des Klosters S. Paolo dei Carmelitani Scalzi in Florenz. Nach der Plünderung des Klosters durch napoleonische Truppen dürfte die Handschrift in die Vatikanische Bibliothek gelangt sein, wie aus einem Eintrag in einem englischen Auktionskatalog von 1827 hervorgeht. Sie blieb in England, bis sie aus der Sammlung des Bibliophilen Beriah Botfield für die Braginsky Collection erworben wurde.
Die ursprünglich zweibändige Handschrift wurde im 19. Jahrhundert neu in vier Bänden gebunden. Der erste Teil umfasste zuvor den Pentateuch und die Hagiografen (die «poetischen» und «historischen» Schriften sowie die fünf Rollen), der zweite Teil enthielt die prophetischen Schriften. Am Schluss des zweiten und heute vierten Bandes notierte der Schreiber Isaak ben Ischai Sason, der auch die Vokalisierungen vorgenommen hatte, er habe das Manuskript im Jahr 1491 in der kastilischen Stadt Ocaña beendet. Am Schluss des ursprünglich ersten und heute zweiten Bandes befindet sich ein weiteres Kolophon, das von einem Schmuckrahmen mit verschlungenen Bandornamenten umschlossen ist. Dieses gibt an, die Handschrift sei 1494 in Evora im Königreich Portugal fertiggestellt worden, zwei Jahre nach der Vertreibung der Juden aus dem spanischen Kastilien. Es mag irritieren, dass Isaak ben Ischai Sason die beiden Teile nicht in der kanonischen Abfolge der biblischen Bücher geschrieben haben soll. Möglicherweise ging der Pentateuch-Teil bei der Vertreibung verloren und musste deshalb ein zweites Mal abgeschrieben werden.
Der kalligrafischen Tradition entsprechend, sind die Wörter des Liedes des Mose (Deuteronomium 32:1–43) in zwei Kolumnen wie übereinandergeschichtete Ziegelsteine arrangiert. Die vertikale Anordnung der Masora magna zu beiden Seiten der Schlusspartie des vorangehenden Textes zeugt von der einfühlsamen Fertigkeit dieses jüdischen Schriftkünstlers.

Aus: Schöne Seiten. Jüdische Schriftkultur aus der Braginsky Collection, Hrsg. von Emile Schrijver und Falk Wiesemann, Zürich 2011, S. 238.
Go to Annotations

Online Since: 12/17/2015

Preview Page
Zürich, Braginsky Collection, B243 Vol. 4
Parchment · 193 ff. · 32.2 x 26.3 · Ocaña (Spain), copied and vocalized by Isaac ben Ishai Sason · 1491
Hebrew Bible

e-codices · 05/21/2015, 14:57:09
In the eighteenth century, this Hebrew Bible with Masorah Magna and Parva was housed in the library of the Convent of the Discalced Carmelites of S. Paolo in Florence. After that library was sacked by Napoleonic forces, the manuscript may have been in the Vatican Library for a short while; the only source for this information is an English auction catalogue of 1827 in which the manuscript appeared. It remained in England until it was acquired from the library of the bibliophile Beriah Botfield for the Braginsky Collection.
Although the manuscript was bound into four volumes in England during the nineteenth century, the original consisted of two parts, each with its own colophon. The first part comprised the Pentateuch and the Hagiographa, while the second contained all the books of the Prophets. At the end of the original second volume, now the fourth volume (page 73), the scribe and vocalizer Isaac ben Ishai Sason stated that he finished copying the manuscript in 1491 in Ocaña, in Castile. At the end of the original first volume, now the second volume, he wrote a colophon with another year of completion, 1494 (page 71).
This appears within a detailed interlaced frame with pen flourishes along the outer and part of the inner borders. He finished this part, however, in Evora, in the Kingdom of Portugal. With his fellow Jews Isaac had been expelled from Spain in 1492 and forced to flee to Portugal, where he copied the Pentateuch and Hagiographa. In the latter colophon the scribe even indicated that it had been two years since the expulsion from Castile. Whether he did indeed copy the manuscript in this unusual order, first Prophets, then Pentateuch and Hagiographa, or whether an original first part got lost as a result of the expulsion, necessitating its replacement, cannot be known.
According to tradition, the text of the Song of Moses, (Ha'azinu) Deuteronomy 32:1–43 (page 74), is ar- ranged as two columns composed of bricks placed one above the other. The vertical arrangement of the Masorah Magna on either side of the single column of text of the end of the chapter that precedes the song, displays Isaac ben Ishai Sason’s keen artistic sensibility.

From: A Journey through Jewish Worlds. Highlights from the Braginsky collection of Hebrew manuscripts and printed books, hrsg. E. M. Cohen, S. L. Mintz, E. G. L. Schrijver, Amsterdam, 2009, p. 70.
Go to Annotations

Online Since: 12/17/2015

Preview Page
Zürich, Braginsky Collection, B247
Paper · 70 ff. · 18 x 13 cm · [Germany] · ca. 1670-1671
Evronot ("Rules for Calculation of the Calendar")

e-codices · 01/20/2015, 09:02:53
In October 1582 Pope Gregory XIII changed the calendar of the Catholic church. Heightened awareness of calendars caused by this action, and the resultant feelings of superiority by Jews regarding their own, stimulated the production of separate books on the calculation of the Jewish calendar in the Ashkenazic world. Sifrei Evronot, or Books of Intercalations, exist, among others, in illustrated Ashkenazic manuscripts of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The understanding of the relationship between the texts and images of these owes a great deal to a recent study on the topic by Elisheva Carlebach.
A common image in Sifrei Evronot manuscripts is that of a man on a ladder, or near it, who reaches to heaven to obtain the secrets of the calendar. The man, who often holds an hourglass in his hand, is the biblical Issachar, one of Jacob’s sons. His presence may be explained by I Chronicles 12:33, where reference is made to "the Issacharites, men who knew how to interpret the signs of the times." The Braginsky manuscript is the only known example that contains two images of Issachar. His appearance in each is different, but in both he holds an hourglass in his hand and stands on a ladder that rests on an unusual structure that contains letters of the Hebrew alphabet between its columns. Whereas the text facing the first image refers to Issachar, that facing the second contains no mention of him or any other figure. The first image incorporates another common element found in Sifrei Evronot illustrations, the moon with a human face, here, again, in two variant forms.
The manuscript begins with a panel containing only the word tzivvah (He [God] commanded). The page contains a portal, intended as a gateway to the celestial spheres, but which is also typical of the architectural motifs commonly used on title pages to signify a symbolic entry into the text. By writing on the construction of the calendar, scribes believed they fulfilled a religious commandment.
In this manuscript, there are numerous other decorative elements, but only one additional illustration; it portrays Moses seated at a table holding the Tablets of the Law. Depictions of Moses appear in other Sifrei Evronot manuscripts as well. The three illustrations in the Braginsky manuscript are all flat line drawings, filled in with watercolor.

From: A Journey through Jewish Worlds. Highlights from the Braginsky collection of Hebrew manuscripts and printed books, hrsg. E. M. Cohen, S. L. Mintz, E. G. L. Schrijver, Amsterdam, 2009, p. 98.
Go to Annotations

Online Since: 03/19/2015

Preview Page
Zürich, Braginsky Collection, B247
Paper · 70 ff. · 18 x 13 cm · [Germany] · ca. 1670-1671
Evronot ("Rules for Calculation of the Calendar")

e-codices · 01/20/2015, 09:17:22
Die Kalenderreform Papst Gregors XIII. im Oktober 1582 löste bei den Juden eine erhöhte Aufmerksamkeit für ihr eigenes System der Kalenderberechnung aus. In der aschkenasischen Welt herrschte dabei das Bewusstsein vor, das dem christlichen überlegene System zu besitzen.
Aus dem 17. und 18. Jahrhundert ist eine Reihe von handschriftlichen Sifre ewronot («Bücher der Kalkulationen») bekannt, von denen einige mit Illustrationen versehen sind. Nicht selten zeigen diese einen Mann vor oder auf einer himmelwärts gerichteten Leiter. Dieser Mann, oft mit einem Stundenglas in der Hand, repräsentiert den biblischen Issachar, einen der Söhne Jakobs. Denn in 1 Chronik 12:32 heisst es: «Die Söhne Issachars, die sich auf die [Berechnung der] Zeit verstanden». Das Manuskript der Braginsky Collection ist das einzige bekannte Exemplar, das zwei Versionen dieses Motivs zeigt. In beiden hält Issachar das Stundenglas und steht auf einer Leiter, die jeweils an ein ungewöhnliches architektonisches Gebilde gelehnt ist. Die erste Illustration zeigt – den Darstellungen in anderen Sifre ewronot ähnlich – auch Abbildungen des abnehmenden und zunehmenden Mondes mit menschlichem Gesicht und umgeben von Sternen.
Die Eröffnungsseite der Handschrift weist einen ornamentalen Architekturbogen auf, ein in hebräischen Handschriften und Büchern sehr übliches dekoratives Eingangsmotiv, das hier aber sozusagen als Portal zu den himmlischen Sphären zu interpretieren ist. Im Bogen steht nur ein einziges Wort, ziwwa («Er [Gott] befahl»), wurde doch die Berechnung des Kalenders von Autoren und Schreibern als Erfüllung eines religiösen Gebots betrachtet. In diesem Manuskript tauchen zwar noch weitere grafische Ornamente auf, aber nur eine andere figürliche Illustration. Sie zeigt Moses, wie er mit den Zehn-Gebote-Tafeln an einem Tisch sitzt. Auch dieses Moses-Motiv ist aus anderen Handschriften der Sifre ewronot bekannt.

Aus: Schöne Seiten. Jüdische Schriftkultur aus der Braginsky Collection, Hrsg. von Emile Schrijver und Falk Wiesemann, Zürich 2011, S. 124.
Go to Annotations

Online Since: 03/19/2015

Preview Page
Zürich, Braginsky Collection, B250
Parchment · 247 ff. · 27 x 19 cm · [Italy] · [late 13th or early 14th century]
Zedekiah ben Abraham, Shibbolei ha-Leket ("Ears of Gleaning"), copied by the scribes Moses and Samuel

e-codices · 11/27/2014, 17:35:31
Although his exact dates are unknown, Zedekiah ben Abraham Anav of Rome is believed to have lived there between 1225 and approximately 1297. He studied in Germany with famous halakhic scholars such as Jacob of Wuerzburg (13th century) and Meir ben Baruch of Rothenburg (d. 1293). Zedekiah’s main work is Shibbolei ha-Leket (Ears of Gleaning), one of the first attempts in Italy to codify Jewish law. It encompasses a systematic overview and discussion of the rules concerning the liturgy and laws of Shabbat, holidays, and fasts, interspersed with other halakhic material. It has a strong Ashkenazic tone and makes no mention of the works of the great Sephardic codifier Moses Maimonides (1138–1204). Shibbolei ha-Leket has twelve sections, subdivided into a total of 372 numbered paragraphs.
Zedekiah ben Abraham was a member of the well-known Italian Anav, or Anau, family, most of whose members lived in Rome during the Middle Ages. The Hebrew designation used by the family was min ha-anavim, “of the Anavs.” Family tradition had it that they descended from one of four aristocratic families of Jerusalem who were brought to Rome by Titus after the destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem in the year 70. Famous members of the family included the lexicographer Nathan ben Jehiel (ca. 1035–1106), author of the dictionary Arukh, and Jehiel ben Jekuthiel Anav (second half of the 13th century), an important author on ethics and the scribe of the famous Leiden manuscript of the Palestinian Talmud (Leiden, University Library, Or. 4720). Other family members were important halakhists and poets. The Braginsky manuscript, although undated, may have been copied during the lifetime or shortly after the death of the author; it is among the earliest surviving copies of the text. The two scribes who copied it left their mark in the work by embellishing their names when they appeared as an acrostic in three consecutive lines of text (“Moses” on page 165) or in full within the text (“Samuel” on pages 292 and 397).

From: A Journey through Jewish Worlds. Highlights from the Braginsky collection of Hebrew manuscripts and printed books, hrsg. E. M. Cohen, S. L. Mintz, E. G. L. Schrijver, Amsterdam, 2009, p. 38.
Go to Annotations

Online Since: 12/18/2014

Preview Page
Zürich, Braginsky Collection, B250
Parchment · 247 ff. · 27 x 19 cm · [Italy] · [late 13th or early 14th century]
Zedekiah ben Abraham, Shibbolei ha-Leket ("Ears of Gleaning"), copied by the scribes Moses and Samuel

e-codices · 11/27/2014, 17:50:42
Verfasser der halachischen Schrift Schibbole ha-leket («Ährenlese») ist Zedekia ben Abraham Anaw von Rom. Seine exakten Lebensdaten sind unbekannt, sie werden von 1225 bis ungefähr 1297 angenommen. Er betrieb seine Studien in Deutschland zur gleichen Zeit wie die berühmten halachischen Gelehrten Jakob von Würzburg und Meir ben Baruch von Rothenburg. Zedekias Hauptwerk Schibbole ha-leket ist einer der ersten in Italien unternommenen Versuche, das jüdische Religionsgesetz zu kodifizieren. Das Werk bietet einen systematischen Überblick. Es gibt die Diskussionen der Vorschriften über die Ordnung der Gebete und die Regeln für Sabbat, Feiertage und Fasttage wieder. Zudem enthält es anderweitige halachische Materien. Die «Ährenlese» ist in zwölf Grossabschnitte gegliedert, die wiederum in insgesamt 372 Paragrafen unterteilt sind. Den Zugang prägt eine ausgesprochen aschkenasische Perspektive. Moses Maimonides, der grosse sefardische Gesetzesinterpret, wird überhaupt nicht einbezogen.
Zedekia ben Abraham gehörte der weithin bekannten Anaw-(oder Anau-)Familie an, die im Mittelalter in Rom ansässig war. Ihrer Überlieferung zufolge stammte sie von einer jener vier Familien ab, die unter Kaiser Titus nach der Zerstörung des Jerusalemer Tempels im Jahr 70 nach Rom verbracht worden seien. Mitglieder dieser Familie waren so bedeutende Persönlichkeiten wie der Lexikograf Nathan ben Jechiel (um 1035–1106), Verfasser des Wörterbuchs Aruch, oder Jekutiel Anaw (zweite Hälfte 13. Jahrhundert), ein wichtiger Autor ethischer Werke und Kopist der berühmten Leidener Handschrift des Palästinischen Talmuds (Universitätsbibliothek Leiden, Or. 4720). Andere waren bedeutende Halachisten oder Dichter.
Das Braginsky-Manuskript, obwohl nicht datiert, könnte noch zu Lebzeiten des Autors oder kurz danach kopiert worden sein. Es ist eine der frühesten existierenden Abschriften dieses Textes. Die beiden Kopisten – mit Namen Moses und Samuel – signierten ihre Arbeit durch Akrostichen auf den Seiten 165, 292 und 397.

Aus: Schöne Seiten. Jüdische Schriftkultur aus der Braginsky Collection, Hrsg. von Emile Schrijver und Falk Wiesemann, Zürich 2011, S. 60.
Go to Annotations

Online Since: 12/18/2014

Preview Page
Zürich, Braginsky Collection, B251
Parchment · 81 ff. · 18.7 x 13.7 cm · [Italy] · [14th/15th century]
Abraham Abulafia (1240–after 1291), Hayyei ha-Olam ha-Ba ("Life of the World to Come")

e-codices · 11/27/2014, 18:03:11
Judaism has always reflected two opposing attitudes toward Kabbalah. The first seeks to limit the study and practice of Jewish mysticism to a limited circle of students as an esoteric system, while the second wants to reach out to larger Jewish audiences. In medieval Spain one of the most important kabbalists was Abraham Abulafia (1240–after 1291). Abulafia did not consider Kabbalah to be a form of gnosis, or a theosophical theory; his conceptions of Kabbalah have little or nothing to do with the well-known kabbalistic schools that concentrate on the Sefirot, or the structure of the Divine being. Instead, through certain mystical techniques and experiences, Abulafia attempted to achieve a state of prophetic-mystical ecstasy, inspired by his conviction that the experience of the prophets was an ecstatic one and that all true mystics are prophets. Abulafia met with fierce opposition, but that did not prevent his doctrine from becoming extremely popular.
Particularly important among his many works are his kabbalistic manuals, the best known of which is Hayyei ha-Olam ha-Ba (Life of the World to Come). It is also known as Sefer ha-Shem (Book of the [Divine] Name), Sefer ha-Iggulim (Book of Circles), or, as in the Braginsky manuscript, Sefer ha-Shem ha-Meforash (Book of the Ineffable Name). This work contains ten circles executed in red and black ink and 128 slightly different circles executed in black, which are, in fact, detailed instructions for mystical meditation. The seventy-two-lettered Name (arrived at by a combi- nation of the numerical value of the letters in the names of the twelve tribes, the Patriarchs, and the nine letters of the words shivtei yisra’el [the tribes of Israel]) is recited while contemplating these circles, in which different Divine Names are broken down into new structures by means of combinations of letters. The reader is supposed to enter each circle at its “entrance,” slightly to the right of the top of the circle, indicated in the larger circles in black and red by a small twirled pen stroke. During these exercises the mystic is advised by Abulafia to withdraw into a house where one’s voice cannot be overheard.

From: A Journey through Jewish Worlds. Highlights from the Braginsky collection of Hebrew manuscripts and printed books, hrsg. E. M. Cohen, S. L. Mintz, E. G. L. Schrijver, Amsterdam, 2009, p. 48.
Go to Annotations

Online Since: 12/18/2014

Preview Page
Zürich, Braginsky Collection, B251
Parchment · 81 ff. · 18.7 x 13.7 cm · [Italy] · [14th/15th century]
Abraham Abulafia (1240–after 1291), Hayyei ha-Olam ha-Ba ("Life of the World to Come")

e-codices · 11/27/2014, 18:08:53
Im Judentum gab es immer zwei einander widersprechende Haltungen gegenüber der Kabbala. Die eine möchte das Studium und die Praxis der jüdischen Mystik als esoterisches System auf einen kleinen Kreis Eingeweihter beschränken, die andere versucht ein grösseres jüdisches Publikum zu erreichen. Einer der bedeutendsten Kabbalisten im mittelalterlichen Spanien war Abraham Abulafia (1249–nach 1291). Er betrachtete die Kabbala weder als eine Form der Gnosis noch als eine Art theosophischer Philosophie. Sein Konzept der Kabbala hat wenig oder nichts mit den bekannten Richtungen zu tun, die sich auf die Sefirot konzentrieren, die Emanationen des göttlichen Wesens. Stattdessen versuchte Abulafia einen Zustand prophetisch-mystischer Ekstase zu erreichen, ausgehend von seiner Überzeugung, dass die Erfahrungen der Propheten ekstatischer Natur und alle wahren Mystiker Propheten gewesen seien. Diese Auffassung rief heftige Widerstände hervor, die der ausserordentlichen Popularität von Abraham Abulafias Lehre jedoch keinen Abbruch taten.
Besonders populär waren seine kabbalistischen Handreichungen, vor allem das Chajje ha-olam ha-ba («Das Leben in der Welt des Jenseits»), bekannt auch unter den Bezeichnungen Sefer ha-Schem («Buch des göttlichen Namens») oder Sefer ha-iggulim («Buch der Kreise»). Das Exemplar der Braginsky Collection fand auch unter dem Namen Sefer ha-Schem ha-meforasch («Buch des unaussprechlichen Namens») Verbreitung. Das Manuskript zeigt zehn in konzentrischen Kreisen verlaufende Inschriften in Schwarz und Rot sowie 128 nur in Schwarz. Sie enthalten detaillierte Anweisungen für die mystische Meditation. Bei der Betrachtung dieser Kreise sollte der 72 Buchstaben zählende Name Gottes rezitiert werden, der durch eine Kombination des Zahlenwerts der Buchstaben in den Namen der zwölf Stämme Israels, der Patriarchen und der neun Buchstaben des Wortes Schiwte Jisra’el («Stämme Israels») zustande kommt. Der lesende Betrachter sollte jeden der dreifachen schwarz-roten Kreise an der Stelle «betreten», die durch einen kleinen Federstrich gewissermassen als «Eingang» bezeichnet ist.

Aus: Schöne Seiten. Jüdische Schriftkultur aus der Braginsky Collection, Hrsg. von Emile Schrijver und Falk Wiesemann, Zürich 2011, S. 112.
Go to Annotations

Online Since: 12/18/2014

Preview Page
Zürich, Braginsky Collection, B252
Parchment · 54 ff. · 19 x 13.5 cm · [Northern Italy] · [last third of the 15th century]
Minhagim ("Religious Customs")

e-codices · 11/28/2014, 16:19:28
Authorship of this book of religious customs is not entirely clear. Its teachings rely on the insights of Jacob Moellin (1360–1427) of Mainz, one of the major halakhic codifiers in the Ashkenazic world. The attribution of the work to Samuel of Ulm is based on a former Jews’ College, London, manuscript (ms. 28,1; presently in the Jesselson Foundation), in which the author is identified as such.
The Braginsky manuscript contains seven fine, red ink drawings. These are part of a tradition of scribal decoration that flourished in northern Italy in the last third of the fifteenth century. The most important representative of that tradition was Joel ben Simeon, the scribe-artist of such famous medieval Haggadot as the Ashkenazi Haggadah (London, British Library, Add. MS. 14762) and the Washington Haggadah (Washington, Library of Congress, Hebr. 1), both of which have been reproduced in facsimile editions.
Particularly striking in the manuscript are the human heads, usually depicted in profile. Suspended from an initial word panel, on folio 31, the bearded head of a man with a long bumpy nose and heavy eyelids appears in many works associated with Joel ben Simeon. Some of his most frequently rendered motifs, such as hares and large architectural structures with round towers, appear in this manuscript as well. Although the art clearly is similar to that found in manuscripts by the hand of Joel ben Simeon, it cannot be determined with certainty that he decorated this work.
On folio 36r, the initial word panel for the Hebrew word hosha’ana, at the beginning of the section dealing with Hoshanah Rabba, the seventh day of the Sukkot festival, is embellished with a depiction of a dragon. This is also a recurring motif in works by Joel ben Simeon. In the bottom margin a man, viewed in profile, wears what is known as a cappuccio a foggia. This contemporary head covering also appears in other manuscripts associated with Joel ben Simeon. Standing near a lectern on which an open book rests, the man holds a lulav (palm branch) and an oversize etrog (citron). Delicate red pen work embellishes the inner margin of this page.

From: A Journey through Jewish Worlds. Highlights from the Braginsky collection of Hebrew manuscripts and printed books, hrsg. E. M. Cohen, S. L. Mintz, E. G. L. Schrijver, Amsterdam, 2009, p. 54.
Go to Annotations

Online Since: 12/18/2014

Preview Page
Zürich, Braginsky Collection, B252
Parchment · 54 ff. · 19 x 13.5 cm · [Northern Italy] · [last third of the 15th century]
Minhagim ("Religious Customs")

e-codices · 11/28/2014, 16:30:39
Die Autorschaft des Buches Minhagim («Religiöse Gebräuche») ist nicht eindeutig geklärt. Die darin enthaltenen Belehrungen beruhen auf den Auffassungen von Jakob Moellin von Mainz (1360–1427), einer der grössten geistigen Autoritäten der aschkenasischen Welt. Die Zuschreibung an Samuel von Ulm beruht auf dessen Namensnennung in einer Handschrift, die vom Jews’ College in London (ms. 28.1) in den Besitz der Jesselson Foundation übergegangen ist.
Im Manuskript der Braginsky Collection finden sich sieben mit roter Tinte ausgeführte Federzeichnungen. Sie stehen in der Illustrationstradition Norditaliens im letzten Drittel des 15. Jahrhunderts. Deren bedeutendster Vertreter war Joel ben Simeon, der so bekannte Handschriften wie die Ashkenazi Haggadah (London, British Library) und die Washington Haggadah (Washington, Library of Congress) illustrierte. Beide liegen in Faksimileausgaben vor. Besonders bemerkenswert an den Federzeichnungen sind die grotesken, meist im Profil wiedergegebenen menschlichen Köpfe. Ähnlich wie in anderen Werken von Joel ben Simeon führt von einem Initialwort ausgehend ein Ornament nach unten, aus dem sich ein Kopf mit ausgeprägter Höckernase und schweren Augenlidern entwickelt (fol. 31). Auch einige andere, von diesem Künstler häufig aufgegriffene Motive finden sich im Manuskript, etwa die Hasen oder eine langgestreckte Stadtmauer mit Rundtürmen. Auf fol. 36r ist das hebräische Initialwort hoscha’ana zum Abschnitt von Hoschana rabba, dem siebten Tag des Laubhüttenfests (Sukkot), mit dem Bild eines Drachens verziert, auch dies ein bekanntes Motiv von Joel ben Simeon. In der Zeichnung am unteren Bildrand trägt ein Mann eine typische zeitgenössische Kopfbedeckung, einen cappuccio a foggia. Er steht vor einem Lesepult mit aufgeschlagenem Buch und hält in der einen Hand einen Lulaw (Palmzweig), in der anderen einen Etrog (Zitrusfrucht), die beide zu den an Sukkot dargebrachten Gaben gehören. Trotz solcher Entsprechungen lässt sich nicht mit Sicherheit feststellen, ob diese Zeichnungen tatsächlich von der Hand Joel ben Simeons stammen.

Aus: Schöne Seiten. Jüdische Schriftkultur aus der Braginsky Collection, Hrsg. von Emile Schrijver und Falk Wiesemann, Zürich 2011, S. 70.
Go to Annotations

Online Since: 12/18/2014

Documents: 123, displayed: 101 - 120