Documents: 77, displayed: 21 - 40

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Basel, Universitätsbibliothek, C I 16
Parchment · 96 ff. · 38.5 x 26 cm · 14th century
Iohannes Andreae, Super librum sextum decretalium

This 14th century parchment manuscript contains the commentaries of the legal expert and canonist Johannes Andreae (around 1270-1348) on the Liber Sextus Decretalium Bonifacii, the third part of the Corpus iuris canonici. The volume came into the possession of the Carthusian monastery of Basel during the Council (1431-1449). (flr)

Online Since: 09/26/2017

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Basel, Universitätsbibliothek, C I 21
Paper · 355 ff. · 40-41 x 28.5-29 cm · 1439
Dominicus de S. Geminiano, Lectura super VI, pars 1

Canonistic manuscript with Dominicus de Sancto Geminiano’s Lectura super librum sextum Decretalium. This volume was written in 1439 by Johannes Berwenstein for Peter Zum Luft, who was teaching at the university of the Council of Basel and who later left his extensive book collection to his nephew Arnold Zum Luft. (flr)

Online Since: 09/26/2017

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Basel, Universitätsbibliothek, C II 1
Paper · 309 ff. · 41 x 28.5 cm · 2nd quarter of the 15th century
Iohannes de Imola, Lectura super Clementinas

This manuscript from the second quarter of the 15th century contains the Lectura super Clementinas by Johannes de Imola; it is from the extensive library of the Basel jurist Arnold Zum Luft (1453-1517). This volume, originally a catenatus, contains initials by the same hand as in C I 21.   (flr)

Online Since: 09/26/2017

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Basel, Universitätsbibliothek, A IX 7
Paper · 212 ff. · 20.5 x 14 cm · 2nd quarter of the 15th century
Iodocus Gartner

This volume with Quaestiones by the Viennese theologian Iodocus Gartner (attested between 1424 and 1452) was owned by Albertus Loeffler (middle of the 15th century); it was part of the chained library of the Dominican Monastery of Basel. (flr)

Online Since: 09/26/2017

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Basel, Universitätsbibliothek, A IX 22
Parchment · 181 ff. · 20-20.5 x 12.5 cm · beginning of the 13th century
Monastica et canonistica

This manuscript from the beginning of the 13th century is of unknown origin; it contains monastic and canonistic writings, among them, for example, the monastery rule that Benedict of Nursia issued for his monastery at Monte Cassino in 529, Gregory the Great’s Regula pastoralis about the ideal of the (secular) pastor of souls from the late 6th century, or the abbreviated version of a part of the Decretum Gratiani from the 12th century. (flr)

Online Since: 09/26/2017

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Basel, Universitätsbibliothek, A IX 23a
Paper · 14 ff. · 16.5 x 11.5 cm · Basel · around 1475
Ars moriendi, German

These 14 leaves were removed from a composite manuscript from the Carthusian Monastery of Basel around the end of the 19th century. The 11 colored woodcuts with the respective handwritten text transmit a German Ars moriendi, a type of text on the art of dying well that was very popular during the late Middle Ages. (flr)

Online Since: 09/26/2017

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Basel, Universitätsbibliothek, A IX 49
Paper · 21 ff. · 21.5 x 15 cm · Paris · 1397
Konradus de Geilenhusen, Epistula concordiae

These 21 leaves with Conrad of Gelnhausen’s Epistula concordiae originally were part of a composite manuscript of theological content from the Dominican monastery of Basel. The text was written in Paris in 1397 by Heinrich Jäger from Ulm. The content takes up a proposal elaborated at the suggestion of King Charles V of France for the resolution of the Great Schism of 1378; Conrad of Gelnhausen proposes the convocation of a general council. (flr)

Online Since: 09/26/2017

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Basel, Universitätsbibliothek, A XI 36
Paper · 154 ff. · 29 x 21 cm · 1429-1431
Robertus Holcoth OP, Quaestiones super quattuor libros sententiarum

Commentary on the Sentences by the Dominican theologian Robertus Holcot (ca. 1290-1349), who critically discusses the theological problems raised by Lombard. Robertus Holcot gave lectures on biblical theory at Oxford and was held in high esteem by his contemporaries. This volume, originally a catenatus from the Dominican monastery in Basel, was created between 1429 and 1431. (flr)

Online Since: 09/26/2017

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Basel, Universitätsbibliothek, B I 11
Parchment · 299 ff. · 36.5 x 27 cm · Basel (?) · about 1460
Missale Basiliense

Missal for the Diocese of Basel, created around 1460. This richly illustrated volume was part of a donation by the widow Margaretha Brand († 1474) to the Carthusian Monastery of Basel. It was used at the altar of the holy Virgin in the small cloister of the Carthusian Monastery. In terms of art history, the manuscript can be assigned to the "Vullenhoe-Gruppe." (stu)

Online Since: 09/26/2017

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Basel, Universitätsbibliothek, B IX 36
Parchment · 290 ff. · 16.5 x 11-11.5 cm · Basel · 1479
Carthusian Statutes

This manuscript, completed in 1479 by Johannes Gipsmüller, contains the Consuetudines Ordinis Cartusiensis, collected and approved by Pope Innocent; these are the “customs” of the Carthusian monks. It also contains the Statuta antiqua and the Statuta nova, additional decisions and regulations established by the general chapter. Bound into the front of the volume is a depiction of the martyrdom of St. Barbara. (flr)

Online Since: 09/26/2017

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Basel, Universitätsbibliothek, F VI 28
Paper · 306 ff. · 21 x 14.5 cm · first half of the 15th century
Aristotelica

This volume contains two commentaries on Aristotle’s Libri physicorum; the authors are Friedrich von Nürnberg and Johannes Buridanus. They were copied in 1439 by Albrecht Löffler from Rheinfelden during his studies at the University of Heidelberg. Later he joined the Dominican Order and left this manuscript to the Dominican Convent of Basel, where it became part of the chained library. (gam/flr)

Online Since: 09/26/2017

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Bern, Burgerbibliothek, Cod. AA 91
Paper · 181 ff. · 31 x 21.5 cm · 1467
Wolfram von Eschenbach: Parzival, German

The so-called "Berner Parzival" is the last dated manuscript of Wolfram von Eschenbach’s epic poem about the Holy Grail, created between 1200 and 1210; moreover, this textual witness is adorned with illustrations. Presumably the Bernese merchant Jörg Friburger commissioned the manuscript in 1467 from the scribe Johann Stemhein of Konstanz, who edited and stylistically modernized the text of his model to match the tastes of a late medieval urban public. In addition, he gave directions for illustrations, which were later executed by a painter who created 28 colored pen and ink drawings. The further history of this manuscript,which today consists of 180 leaves, is unknown; it must, however, have reached the Bernese municipal library in the early years of the 19th century, where it is attested at least since 1816. (mit)

Online Since: 09/26/2017

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Cologny, Fondation Martin Bodmer, Cod. Bodmer 37
Paper · 112 ff. · 29 x 20 cm · 14th century (1360-1370)
Giovanni Boccaccio, Comedia delle ninfe fiorentine (Ameto)

The Comedia delle ninfe fiorentine or Ameto, an early work (around 1341) by Boccaccio, recounts the transformation of the rough shepherd Ameto into a virtuous man after overhearing the stories told by seven nymphs, allegories of the virtues. The text is written as a prosimetrum — alternating prose and verse — as is immediately obvious from the single column page-design of the manuscript. Copied on paper without watermark, the manuscript opens with a single initial in watercolor that contains the coats of arms of the Almerici family (f. 2r), the owner of this copy who probably also commissioned it. (rou)

Online Since: 09/26/2017

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Cologny, Fondation Martin Bodmer, Cod. Bodmer 95
Parchment · I + 118 + I ff. · 22.5 x 14.5 cm · end of the 13th – beginning of the 14th century
Jean de Thuin, Roman de Jules César

This manuscript is one of four known textual witnesses (not counting a fragment) of the Roman de Jules César attributed to Jean de Thuin, a poem of about 9,500 alexandrines that is an adaptation of Lucan’s epic poem the Pharsalia. The beginning and the end of the text of the Roman are missing in this manuscript, where the main divisions in the poem are signaled by alternating blue and red initials placed at the beginning of each stanza and accompanied by filigree in the opposite color. (rou)

Online Since: 09/26/2017

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Cologny, Fondation Martin Bodmer, Cod. Bodmer 97
Parchment · 83 ff. · 21.5 x 15 cm · Italy (perhaps Bologna) · 13th century
Iohannes Damascenus, De fide orthodoxa (translated into Latin by Burgundio of Pisa)

This 13th century manuscript is from Italy and contains the first four books of the work De fide orthodoxa, written in Greek by John of Damascus. As the title (f. 1r) indicates, this text was translated into Latin at the request of Pope Eugene III (1145-1153) by the jurist and prolific translator Burgundio of Pisa. Numerous marginal glosses, for the most part contemporaneous with the creation of this copy of the manuscript, are sprinkled throughout the text. (rou)

Online Since: 09/26/2017

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Cologny, Fondation Martin Bodmer, Cod. Bodmer 120
Parchment · 36 ff. · 25.4 x 14.5 cm · Sicily · 11th or 11th-12th century
Origenes, Commentarii in Canticum Canticorum (translated into Latin by Rufinus Aquileiensis)

This manuscript, which was copied in Norman Sicily, contains Origen's Commentary on the Song of Songs in the version translated from Greek into Latin by Rufinus of Aquileia (about 345-about 411). The text comprises the first four of the ten books of which Origen’s original text must have consisted. It is preceded by a prologue by Jerome and is followed by short prayer by Gregory of Nazianzus, also translated into Latin by Rufinus of Aquileia. Origen's commentary, which presents Christ as the bridegroom and the Church, or also the individual soul, as the bride, influenced spiritual interpretations of the Song of Songs for centuries. (rou)

Online Since: 09/26/2017

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Cologny, Fondation Martin Bodmer, Cod. Bodmer 728-3
Paper · 1 f. · 6.5 x 17.6 cm · North-Western India · 19th century
Śrīyogarāja, Guhyaṣoḍhā

This is a text called Guhyaṣoḍhā written by Śrīyogarāja [the name means « Glorious king of yoga », and is an honorific title rather than a proper name], and it is in part based on the very ancient tantric text called the Rudrayāmal. Guhya[kālī]ṣoḍhā / Guhyaṣoḍha means a text featuring a sequence of mantras that a tāntrika would need to recite in order to "purify" himself and the mantra that precedes the recitation of the root-mantra of the deity. This text traverses the religious space at the intersection of Hinduism and Buddhism. (ser)

Online Since: 09/26/2017

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Cologny, Fondation Martin Bodmer, B-29.8
Paper · 4 pp. · 24 x 31.1 cm · ca. 1818
Ludwig van Beethoven, Missa solemnis op. 123, Gloria (sketch). Autographic score on paper

According to Beethoven, this is his “most accomplished work.” It celebrates the consecration of his student and sponsor, Archduke Rudolph, as Archbishop of Olomouc (Olmütz) in 1818. This mass was begun in 1818; it was completed three years after the ceremony and was presented to the cardinal and archbishop on 19 March 1823. This mass in D major seeks to express and communicate, in the words of the composer himself, a state of mind, a religious Stimmung. It is written for a large orchestra and consists of five movements (Kyrie, Gloria, Credo, Sanctus, Agnus Dei) The sections of the Gloria, imposed by the meaning of the text, constitute a sonata: allegro in D major, Gratias in B flat and back to the allegro; then the larghetto and as a third movement the allegro, Quoniam, the fugue In gloria Dei Patris, with a cyclical return to the theme of the Gloria in the principal tone. The music comments on the text: royal acclamation, heartfelt gratitude, divine omnipotence; then, in contrast: prayers, shouts and murmurs of the supplicants of this world (miserere nobis). Purchased at Sotheby’s, London, 4 February 1952.   (bib)

Online Since: 09/26/2017

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Cologny, Fondation Martin Bodmer, H-71.2
Paper · 1 f. · 28.6 x 26.4 cm · not dated
Victor Hugo, Oh ! N'insultez jamais une femme qui tombe, signed autograph

This famous poem, probably written on 6 September 1835, is part of the composite manuscript Les chants du crépuscule that was published in the same year. Hugo movingly denounces the condition of prostitutes: he actually invites the reader to sympathize with rather than despise the “fallen women”. This symbolic vocabulary, usually denoting moral depravity, is used here not to convey a fault, but to express the courage of women who long struggled against the inevitability of the burden of misery before succumbing to it. Far from a moralizing Manicheism, Hugo assigns faults generally attributed to these women also to “à toi, riche ! à ton or”, pointing a finger at the injustice of a social system lacking any distribution of wealth as well as “à nous”, each citizen whose regard is not charitable enough. This manuscript presents a slight variation of the printed text since it reads: “s’y retenir longtemps de leurs mains épuisées” instead of “s’y cramponner longtemps”. (giv)

Online Since: 09/26/2017

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Cologny, Fondation Martin Bodmer, H-71.4
Paper · 4 pp. · 28.2 x 21.8 cm · not dated
Victor Hugo, Ô madame ! pourquoi ce chagrin qui vous suit, signed autograph

The sixteen verses making up this passage are the sixth and last part of the poem "Dans l'église de ***”, included in the composite manuscript Les chants du crépuscule of 1835. Several themes are interwoven in this poem, which contrasts the probity of a woman praying in the middle of an abandoned church with the city’s hedonists, nihilists hurling themselves "d'ivresses en ivresses”. Hugo surprises this pure soul in the midst of adversity, invoking the help of the Lord to save her from overwhelming sadness. In this last part (VI), the writer increases his Christian support (Votre âme qui bientôt fuira peut-être ailleurs / Vers les régions pures, / Et vous emportera plus loin que nos douleurs, Plus loin que nos murmures !) with an angelic and serene quatrain: Soyez comme l'oiseau, posé pour un instant / Sur des rameaux trop frêles, / Qui sent ployer la branche et qui chante pourtant, / Sachant qu'il a des ailes ! (giv)

Online Since: 09/26/2017

Documents: 77, displayed: 21 - 40