Documents: 62, displayed: 41 - 60

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Samedan, Chesa Planta Samedan, Ab 47
Paper · III + 16 ff. · 15 x 10 cm · 1567
[La histoargia da Joseph] (The story of Joseph)

This is the oldest copy of Gian Travers’ drama “Joseph”, performed in Zuoz in 1534. The manuscript was produced three years after the death of Travers and makes use of spellings that were no longer in use at the time the copy was made. The scribe is Conradin Planta, probably a relative: Gian Travers was married to Anna Planta. The manuscript is bound incorrectly: the text begins with ff. 9-13, then there is a leaf missing, f. 14, f. 1, f. 5, f. 3, f. 4, f. 6, f. 2, f. 15, a missing leaf, f. 7, f. 16. Folio 8r, originally the final page, contains a cautionary poem; f. 8v was left blank. The front flyleaves are made of a large parchment sheet, originally from a 12th century parchment manuscript with a text by Constantine the African, De febribus, chap. 3-5. (dar)

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Samedan, Chesa Planta Samedan, Ad 109
Paper · 80 ff. · 15 x 10 cm · 1649
Joseph da Iacobb (Drama about Joseph)

This manuscript contains the text of a Lower Engadine version of a drama about Joseph (ff. 1-74), which is based on the play “Ein hüpsch nüwes Spil von Josephen (…)”, attributed to Jacob Ruf and printed in Zurich in 1540. Converging indicators, such as the statements by Chiampell (Placidus Plattner, Ulrici Campelli Historia raetica, Basel, Schneider, T. 2 1890, 353), as well as the orthography and the language of the transcriptions suggest that this is the only surviving copy of the Joseph-drama by Chiampell himself, which was performed in Susch in 1564. At the end of the manuscript, there is a conversation between a Protestant pastor and a sick person (ff. 75-77), as well as several prayers (ff. 78-80), which were translated from the German by the scribe of the text, Baltasar Valantin. (dar)

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Samedan, Chesa Planta Samedan, Statuten 1619
Paper · 300 ff. · 30 x 21 cm · 1619
Ledschas et stratüts civils dalg cumoen d’Engiadina zura sur Punt Hota (laws and civil statutes of the community of Upper Engadine regarding Punt Ota)

This manuscript first contains the translation of the Latin statutes of the district of Upper Engadine from 1563, with additions until 1618, in the handwriting of Peider Curtin (ff. 1-245a). Supplements from 1624-1654 in another handwriting are incorporated or added later ff. 245b-254a. This is followed by translations from the German of other important legal texts in Peider Curtin’s handwriting: the Charta da la Lia from 1524 (ff. 262-267), the Articles of Chur from 1523, later of Ilanz in 1524 (ff. 268-271), Artichels da cumoenas Trais Lias from 1527 (ff. 272-278), a contract between the League of God's House cun l’s sett chantuns Schwizers from 1498 (ff. 279-282), and the 1518 “Erbeinigungsvertrag” (testamentary agreement) concerning the Engadin between Emperor Maximilian and the Bishop of Chur (ff. 283-289). Next comes an index of the statutes (ff. 291-295) in Curtin’s hand and an index to the supplements (f. 296) in another hand. The scribe is Peider Curtin; according to a statement on the title page, however, the statutes are the work of the well-known Protestant pastor and notary Lüci Papa. (dar)

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Schlatt, Eisenbibliothek, Mss 23
Paper · 208 pp. · 17-18 x 21.5-22 cm · 1856-1857
H. [Hermann] Wedding, About the Freiberg smelting industry; Procedures of the Freiberg smelteries. Copy from a notebook by H. Th. [Hieronymus Theodor] Richter; H. [Hermann] Wedding, various notes

This manuscript is a collection of notes, which were compiled by Hermann Wedding (1834-1908), later professor of ferrous metallurgy at the Bergakademie Berlin (mining academy), during his visits to the smelteries in Freiberg (Saxony) in 1856/57. The notes were taken while he was a student at the Freiberg mining academy and include his own observations of the procedures at the various silver and lead smelteries around Freiberg. The notes also contain copies of relevant scientific publications about metallurgical procedures that were used in Freiberg. (ham)

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Schlatt, Eisenbibliothek, Mss 24
Paper · 98 pp. · 17.5 x 20.5 cm · 1858
H. [Hermann] Wedding, Journey through Thuringia, Bavaria, Saarbrücken, Lorraine, the region of the Rhine, Westphalia

This travel journal was kept by Hermann Wedding (1834-1908), later a professor of ferrous metallurgy, during his study tour in August and September of 1858. At this time, he was a student at the mining academy of Freiberg and Berlin. The objective of the trip was to visit the centers of the German mining industry that were emerging in the middle of the 19th century, especially in the region of the Saar and the Ruhr. Wedding’s daily entries document his visits to coal mines, smelteries and metal processing companies. He describes the operating facilities and production processes of the plants he visited. The journal reveals his deep scientific interest in the geological conditions in which the plants he describes are embedded. (ham)

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Schlatt, Eisenbibliothek, Mss 25
Paper · 328 + 48 pp. · 17-18.5 x 21-23.5 cm · 1860-1862
Hermann Wedding, Journal of a metallurgical journey through Germany, Belgium and England

This manuscript documents several trips by Hermann Wedding (1834-1908), later a professor of ferrous metallurgy, to Great Britain in the years 1860 and 1862. Wedding undertook these trips as a referendary for the Prussian mining administration. On his way to Great Britain via Belgium, he noted his observations regarding operating facilities and production processes at smelteries and mining operations in daily entries. Among the plants he described are the ironworks at Seraing (Belgium), the metallurgical works in South Wales that were considered especially advanced in the middle of the 19th century, and the first steelworks that made use of the Bessemer process. The journal entries also reveal Wedding’s connections with contemporary specialists in his field. (ham)

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Sion/Sitten, Médiathèque Valais, RCap 14
Paper · III + 135 + I ff. · 21 x 29 cm · ca. 1431
Guido de Monte Rochen, Manipulus curatorum

This manuscript from the library of the Capuchin monastery of Sion contains the Manipulus curatorum, a handbook of moral and pastoral theology for use by priests that was written in the early 1330s by Guy de Montrocher. The work was widely used in the 15th and 16th centuries. The Capuchin monastery library owns a second old copy of the Manipulus, which, however, is printed: RCap 110, an incunable from 1485 (Rom, Eucharius Silber: Hain 8192). In RCap 14, the Manipulus curatorum is followed by an endpaper, which contains a list, perhaps of dioceses, especially Italian and German dioceses. The flyleaves are parchment; they are two documents issued in Geneva in 1452, which mention, among others, a Johannes Brochuti, canon at Sion. (esc)

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Sion/Sitten, Médiathèque Valais, S 94
Paper · II + 120 + II ff. · 20 x 28.5 cm · Northern Switzerland (?) · 15th century
Jean de Mandeville, Von dem gelobten Land [Voyages]. German translation by Michel Velser

At once a travel memoir and a geography book, the Voyages by John Mandeville, probably written around 1355-1357, were a great success in the Middle Ages. Numerous handwritten copies make it possible to distinguish three different versions of the French text, which gave rise to translations into Latin and into the vernacular languages. The oldest German translation, going back to about 1393-1399, is by Michel Velser, a member of the von Völs family (Völs, South Tyrol). This copy, S 94 from the library of Walter Supersaxo (ca. 1402-1482), Bishop of Sion, and of his son Georges (ca. 1450-1529), contains numerous ornamental initials, some zoomorphic or anthropomorphic. The endpapers are parchment. Based on the language, the manuscript should be from Northern Switzerland. An ownership note on f. 120v mentions an uncle “G”, which may suggest Georges Supersaxo himself. In the binding, there was a fragment of a papal document that can without doubt be dated to the middle of the 13th century, from a Pope Innocent and addressed to the Abbot of Kempten. Ms. S 94 can be compared to another manuscript from the Supersaxo library, namely with S 99, which contains a French version of the Voyages. (esc)

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Sion/Sitten, Médiathèque Valais, S 99
Paper · I + 125 ff. · 22 x 30 cm · Martigny (?) · ca. 1474
Jean de Mandeville, Voyages. Jean de Bourgogne (called à la Barbe), Preservacion de Epidimie

At once a travel memoir and a geography book, the Voyages by John Mandeville, probably written around 1355-1357, were a great success in the Middle Ages. There are three versions of the French text; manuscript S 99 is related to the “continental” version. As in other manuscripts based on this version, the Voyages (ff. 1r-122v, with an explicit on f. 123v and an addendum on ff. 124r-125r) are followed by the Preservacion de Epidimie (ff. 122v-123v). The actual identity of the two authors is unresolved and may even have been confounded. In copy S 99 from the library of Walter Supersaxo (ca. 1402-1482), Bishop of Sion, and of his son Georges (ca. 1450-1529), the upper margins are covered with ornaments of ascending bars, some of which turn into into zoomorphic or anthropomorphic motifs. The Supersaxo library owns another version of the Voyages, namely S 94, in the German translation by Michel Velser. Like two other manuscripts from this same library, S 97bis (composite manuscript with the romance of Pontus and Sidonia) and S 100 (statutes of Savoy), S 99 was copied by Claude Grobanet, who was mentioned in a 1474 document in Martigny, where he served Antoine Grossi Du Châtelard, Lord of Isérables († 1495). In the beginning of the 16th century, the family of Antoine Du Châtelard apparently came into financial difficulties; their property - and probably the three manuscripts as well - passed into the hands of Georges Supersaxo. The incomplete parchment document, which makes up the rear flyleaf, mentions, among others, Martigny, 147[3] and a seigneur d'Ys[érables (?)]. (esc)

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Sion/Sitten, Médiathèque Valais, S 100
Paper · II + 216 ff. · 21 x 30 cm · Martigny (?) · ca. 1473
Compendium statutorum generalis reformationis Sabaudiae [1430]

This manuscript from the library of Walter Supersaxo (ca. 1402-1482), Bishop of Sion, and of his son Georges (ca. 1450-1529), contains a compendium of the statutes of Savoy, a legal code issued in 1430 by Amadeus VIII, the first Duke of Savoy and the future antipope Felix V. The compendium was printed for the first time in 1477 in Turin by Johannes Fabri (Hain 14050, GW M43623). Until 1475, this region of the canton of Valais below the river Morge of Conthey was ruled by the Dukes of Savoy. This manuscript, S 100, can be compared with two other manuscripts from the Supersaxo library, namely with S 97bis (composite manuscript with the romance of Pontus and Sidonia) and S 99 (John Mandeville, Voyages). All three manuscripts were copied by Claude Grobanet, who was mentioned in a 1474 document in Martigny, where he served Antoine Grossi Du Châtelard, Lord of Isérables († 1495). In the beginning of the 16th century, the family of Antoine Du Châtelard apparently came into financial difficulties; their property - and probably the three manuscripts as well - then passed into the hands of Georges Supersaxo. (esc)

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Sion/Sitten, Médiathèque Valais, S 104
Parchment · 167 ff. · 24 x 38 cm · Bologna · beginning of the 14th century
Goffredus Tranensis, Summa super titulis Decretalium

The Summa super titulis (or rubricis) Decretalium is a famous legal treatise about the Decretals of Gregory IX, written around 1241-1243 by Godefridus de Trano, who was professor of canon law in Bologna and later became cardinal († 1245). In this copy, the beginning of each of the five books is marked with an illuminated initial (ff. 1r, 45r, 75v, 105v, 124v). Among the annotations and manicules in the margins and between the columns, there are also numerous small human heads, pen drawings in profile (e.g., on f. 154r). This manuscript is part of the library of Walter Supersaxo (ca. 1402-1482), Bishop of Sion, and of his son Georges (ca. 1450-1529). Before that, the manuscript was the property of Georges de Saluces (Bishop of Aosta 1433 and of Lausanne 1440, deceased 1461), at the time when he was still dean of Puy-en-Velay. The Supersaxo library has another manuscript that originated in Bologna, S 102, which is also from the 14th century and contains legal texts. (esc)

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Sion/Sitten, Médiathèque Valais, S 105
Paper · 92 ff. · 29 x 39 cm · 1474
Terentius, Comoediae

This manuscript from the library of Walter Supersaxo (ca. 1402-1482), Bishop of Sion, and of his son Georges (ca. 1450-1529), contains Terence’s six comedies, each of which begins with an ornamental initial: Andria (f. 5r), Eunuchus (f. 19v), Heautontimoroumenos (f. 35v), Adelphoe (f. 52r), Hecyra (f. 66v), Phormio (f. 78r). The manuscript is part of a bundle of copies which were made, if not by Georges Supersaxo himself, then by a scribe in his service. At the time, the young man was a law student in Basel. This group of manuscripts includes classical pieces (Terrence, Sallust…), but also texts that would be familiar only to scholars (Augustinus Datus, Gasparinus, Barzizius,…). Terence’s comedies take a special place in the collection, since they were recopied into another manuscript in this group, S 101, which remains incomplete. (esc)

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Solothurn, Staatsarchiv, R 1.1.9
Parchment · 1 f. · 13.9 x 20.5 cm · 10th century
Boethius, De institutione musica (Liber IV, cap. 18, Liber V, Capitula), fragment

A leaf in Carolingian minuscule, containing a fragment of De institutione musica by Boethius (Liber VI, chap. 18 and Liber V, Capitula). It constitutes the upper half of the left leaf of fragment R 1.1.10 from the state archives of Solothurn. It is part of the same manuscript as the fragments R 1.5.7, R 1.5.8 and R 1.1.11 from the above-mentioned archives. It was probably used as binding for a document from the archives of the collegiate church of St. Leodegar in Schönenwerd. (ber)

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Solothurn, Staatsarchiv, R 1.1.10
Parchment · 1 f. · 14.5 x 41.3 cm · 10th century
Boethius, De institutione musica (Liber IV, cap. 18, Liber V, Capitula, cap. 2), fragment

Lower half of a bifolium in Carolingian minuscule, containing a fragment of De institutione musica by Boethius (Liber VI, chap. 18 and Liber V, Capitula and chap. 2). The upper half of the left part is fragment R 1.1.9 from the state archives of Solothurn. This fragment is part of the same manuscript as the fragments R 1.5.7, R 1.5.8 and R 1.1.11 from those same archives. It was probably used as binding for a document from the archives of the collegiate church of St. Leodegar in Schönenwerd. (ber)

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Solothurn, Staatsarchiv, R 1.1.11
Parchment · 1 f. · 14 x 21.3 cm · 10th century
Boethius, De institutione musica (Liber I, Proemium, cap. 2), fragment

Upper half of a leaf in Carolingian minuscule, containing a fragment of De institutione musica by Boethius (Liber I, Proemium, chap. 2). It is part of the same manuscript as the fragments R 1.5.7, R.1.5.8, R 1.1.9 and R.1.1.10 from the state archives of Solothurn. It was probably used as binding for a document from the archives of the collegiate church of St. Leodegar in Schönenwerd. (ber)

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Solothurn, Staatsarchiv, R 1.1.17
Parchment · 2 ff. · 42 x 58.1 cm · Fulda · 12th century, 3rd quarter
Fulda Legendary

Bifolio from the third volume (May-June) of a Fulda Legendary that originally consisted of six volumes, commissioned in 1156 by Rugger, provost of Frauenberg Abbey in Fulda. This fragment contains parts of the vita of Boniface by Otloh of St Emmeram; it was written by Eberhard von Fulda. The legendary was still used in the middle of the 16th century in Fulda by Georg Witzel (1501-1573) for his Hagiologium seu de sanctis ecclesiae (Mainz 1541) as well as for his Chorus sanctorum omnium. Zwelff Bücher Historien Aller Heiligen Gottes (Köln 1554). Other fragments from this third volume are in Basel and Nuremberg. It shows that this volume, and at least the 6th volume (November-December) of the legendary as well, reached Basel, where both evidently were used as manuscript waste around 1580. The P-initial 1r has a representation of Boniface inside the bowl of the initial; below that is Rugger, who commissioned the legendary. (stb)

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Solothurn, Staatsarchiv, R 1.5.7
Parchment · 1 f. · 28.6 x 43.1 cm · 10th century
Boethius, De Institutione musica (Liber I, cap. 18-19, 20), fragment

Bifolium in Carolingian minuscule, containing a fragment of De institutione musica by Boethius (Liber I, chap. 18-19, 20). It is part of the same manuscript as the fragments R 1.5.8, R 1.1.9, R 1.1.10 and R 1.1.11 from the state archives of Solothurn. This bifolium was used as binding for the Liber fabricae sub littera C, with accounts from 1522 to 1528 from the collegiate church of St. Leodegar in Schönenwerd. (ber)

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Solothurn, Staatsarchiv, R 1.5.8
Parchment · 1 f. · 29.1 x 42.4 cm · 10th century
Boethius, De institutione musica (Liber I, cap. 23-24; Liber II, cap. 8), fragment

Bifolium in Carolingian minuscule, containing a fragment of De institutione musica by Boethius (Liber I, chap. 23-14 and Liber II, chap. 8). It is part of the same manuscript as the fragments R 1.5.7, R 1.1.9, R 1.1.10 and R 1.1.11 from the state archives of Solothurn. This bifolium was used as binding for the Liber Cellae sub littera AA, with accounts from 1520 from the collegiate church of St. Leodegar in Schönenwerd. (ber)

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Solothurn, Staatsarchiv, R 1.5.12
Parchment · 1 f. · 29.5 x 43 cm · first half of the 10th century
Musica enchiriadis (cap. VII.13-cap. IX.21), fragment

Parchment bifolium containing a part of the 9th century treatise on music theory Musica enchiriadis. While it was attributed to the Benedictine monk Hucbald for a long time, today it is considered the work of an anonymous author. The bifolium was used as binding for the Liber Cellae sub littera V, with accounts from 1526 to 1528 from the collegiate church of St. Leodegar in Schönenwerd. (ber)

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Tesserete, Archivio parrocchiale, codice 1
Parchment · III + 190 pp. · 31.5 x 22.5 cm · Northern Italy (Milan) · 1342
Epistolarium ambrosianum

This manuscript, as yet almost unknown, contains an epistolary following the Ambrosian Rite. It was commissioned in 1342 by the priest Giacomo de Parazo for a church dedicated to St. Fermo not further identified. This manuscript probably reached Tesserete (Canton of Ticino), an area where the Ambrosian Rite was used, in the 15th/16th century; here it was taken apart and rebound, at which time was added a copy of a testament of dubious authenticity written in 1078 by Contessa from the city of Milan for the benefit of the church of S. Stefano in Tesserete. In the 17th century, the manuscript was the property of the Verdoni family of notaries; since the 20th century, it has been held by the parish of Tesserete. On the initial page, St. Ambrose, the patron saint of the diocese of Milan, is represented in an illuminated initial. (ber)

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Documents: 62, displayed: 41 - 60