Documents: 25, displayed: 1 - 20

Sub-project: e-codices 2017-2020

January 2017

Status: In progress

Financed by: swissuniversities

Description: Continued support from the swissuniversities program « Scientific Information » will ensure the sustainability of e-codices and its transformation from a project to an established service. In addition, it will ensure the continued improvement of technical infrastructure. Such ongoing development is necessary in order to contribute to essential technical developments in the area of interoperability in the coming years. Finally, more sub-projects will be initiated in order to publish online by 2020 most of those Swiss manuscripts that, from a current point of view, are relevant to research.

All Libraries and Collections

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Basel, Universitätsbibliothek, AN I 8
Parchment and paper · 385 ff. · ca. 38 x 27 cm · 13th century
Elias Cretensis, Commentarius in S. Gregorii Nazianzeni orationes

Famous for the two portraits of Gregory of Nazianzus and Elias of Crete, as well as for a unique cycle of illustrations in honor of Gregory (of which 5 have been lost), this codex is also noteworthy for its content (19 commentaries by Elias of Crete, still unpublished in Greek) and for the story of its creation. The commentaries were copied around the end of the 12th or the beginning of the 13th century, a project that did not provide for miniatures on the frontispiece. These were added a short time later, together with a prologue. The codex still retains the binding that was created in Constantinople between 1435 and 1437 during a restoration for its new owner, the Dominican John of Ragusa, who brought the codex to Basel in 1437. (and)

Online Since: 06/22/2017

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Frauenfeld, Kantonsbibliothek Thurgau, Y 96
Paper · 22 ff. · 32.5 x 21.5 cm · between 1614 and 1638
Chronicle of Hauterive Abbey

In contrast to other chronicles by Heinrich Murer (1588-1638, from 1614 on a Conventual at the Carthusian Monastery of Ittingen), this entirely chronicle of Hauterive Abbey (FR) is not by Murer’s hand, but was probably only commissioned by the monk from Ittingen to be created at Hauterive Abbey. Regarding the content, the manuscript consists of two parts: the history of the monastery and a list of ecclesial events. The former begins with Abbot Girard (1138-1157) and ends with Abbot Petrus (end of the 16th century); the latter pertains to the years between 1500 and 1510. (sol)

Online Since: 06/22/2017

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Frauenfeld, Kantonsbibliothek Thurgau, Y 97
Paper · 7 ff. · 30.5 x 20 cm · Ittingen, Carthusian Monastery · between 1614 and 1638
Chronicle of the Dominican Monastery of Basel and of the Convent of Maria Magdalena OP in Basel

Chronicle of the Dominican Monastery of Basel and of the Convent of Maria Magdalena OP in Basel by Heinrich Murer (1588-1638, from 1614 on a Conventual at the Carthusian Monastery of Ittingen). The manuscript is divided into the chronicle of the Dominican Monastery and the chronicle of the Convent in Basel. In the first part, Murer describes the building of the Dominican Monastery in 1233 and the development of the diocese of Basel from the 13th to the 15th century. In the second part, Murer turns to the establishment of the convent in the 11th century and its reconstruction in 1253, as well as other ecclesial events until 1465. (sol)

Online Since: 06/22/2017

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Frauenfeld, Kantonsbibliothek Thurgau, Y 98
Paper · 42 ff. · 31.5 x 21 cm · Ittingen, Carthusian Monastery · between 1614 and 1638
Chronicle of the diocese of Chur

Chronicle of the diocese of Chur by Heinrich Murer (1588-1638, from 1614 on a Conventual at the Carthusian Monastery of Ittingen). Murer describes the establishment of the diocese of Chur and names Asinio (451) as its first bishop, followed by 75 more bishops until John IV (1418-1440). Four modern copies of deeds of donation from Emperor Otto I and King Louis the German, as well as annalistic notes, are appended to the chronicle. (sol)

Online Since: 06/22/2017

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Frauenfeld, Kantonsbibliothek Thurgau, Y 99
Paper · 53 + 1 ff. · 32.5 x 20.5 cm · Ittingen, Carthusian Monastery · between 1629 and 1638
Chronicle of Einsiedeln Abbey

Chronicle of Einsiedeln Abbey by Heinrich Murer (1588-1638, from 1614 on a Conventual at the Carthusian Monastery of Ittingen). The description of the abbots from Eberhard (934-958) to Plazidus (1629-1670) is preceded by a pen and ink drawing of the patron saints of the church and a fold-out map of the monastery complex. The chronicle contains copies, written by Murer, of deeds of donation and confirmation that relate to Einsiedeln Abbey. (sol)

Online Since: 06/22/2017

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Frauenfeld, Kantonsbibliothek Thurgau, Y 100
Paper · 7 ff. · 30.5 x 20 cm · Ittingen, Carthusian Monastery · between 1614 and 1638
Chronicle of the Priory of Embrach

Chronicle of the Priory of Embrach by Heinrich Murer (1588-1638, from 1614 on a Conventual at the Carthusian Monastery of Ittingen). In this chronicle, which is incomplete with respect to decoration as well as content, Murer describes a few individual abbots and important events in the history of the monastery. (sol)

Online Since: 06/22/2017

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Frauenfeld, Kantonsbibliothek Thurgau, Y 101
Paper · 22 ff. · 32.3 x 20.2 cm · Ittingen, Carthusian Monastery · between 1631 and 1638
Chronicle of Engelberg Abbey and of the Convent of St. Andreas

Chronicle of Engelberg Abbey and of the Convent of St. Andreas by Heinrich Murer (1588-1638, from 1614 on a Conventual at the Carthusian Monastery of Ittingen). The chronicle begins with a description of the geographic location and the foundation of the monastery (1119). This is followed by the history of Engelberg Abbey from Abbot Adelhelm (1124/26-1131) until Abbot Plazidus Knüttel (1630-1658). In a shorter second part, Murer describes the foundation (1199) and history of the Convent of St. Andreas from 1254-1455. (sol)

Online Since: 06/22/2017

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Frauenfeld, Kantonsbibliothek Thurgau, Y 107
Paper · 126 ff. · 31 x 20.5 cm · Ittingen, Carthusian Monastery · between 1614 and 1638
Chronicle of Konstanz Cathedral, of the collegiate churches of the diocese, of the city of Konstanz and of Reichenau

Chronicle of Konstanz Cathedral, of the collegiate churches of the diocese, of the city of Kon-stanz and of Reichenau by Heinrich Murer (1588-1638, from 1614 on a Conventual at the Car-thusian Monastery of Ittingen). While in Y 106 Murer only addressed the history of the diocese of Konstanz, in this manuscript he goes into more detail about Konstanz and its surroundings. His sources were writings by other clerics, such as the Chronicle of Konstanz by Jakob Rassler (1568-1617). (sol)

Online Since: 06/22/2017

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Frauenfeld, Kantonsbibliothek Thurgau, Y 114
Paper · 6 ff. · 30.5 x 20 cm · Ittingen, Carthusian Monastery · between 1614 and 1638
Chronicle of Selnau Abbey

Chronicle of Selnau Abbey by Heinrich Murer (1588-1638, from 1614 on a Conventual at the Carthusian Monastery of Ittingen). This incomplete manuscript would have treated the Cistercian monasteries of Switzerland in a first part and, in a second more detailed part, the convent of nuns at Selnau. The manuscript remained fragmentary. (sol)

Online Since: 06/22/2017

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Frauenfeld, Kantonsbibliothek Thurgau, Y 116
Paper · 26 ff. · 31 x 20 cm · Ittingen, Carthusian Monastery · between 1614 and 1638
Chronicle of the Grossmünster of Zurich

Chronicle of the Grossmünster of Zurich by Heinrich Murer (1588-1638, from 1614 on a Conventual at the Carthusian Monastery of Ittingen). In this chronicle, Heinrich Murer first gives a detailed history of the city of Zurich and of the Grossmünster, before he begins a list and description of the individual provosts. (sol)

Online Since: 06/22/2017

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Frauenfeld, Kantonsbibliothek Thurgau, Y 118
Paper · 16 ff. · 31 x 20 cm · Ittingen, Carthusian Monastery · between 1614 and 1638
Chronicle of the smaller abbeys and foundations of Zurich

Chronicle of the smaller abbeys and foundations of Zurich by Heinrich Murer (1588-1638, from 1614 on a Conventual at the Carthusian Monastery of Ittingen). This volume is a collection of short, incomplete descriptions giving the history of abbeys and foundations of Zurich, introduced by title pages of pen and ink drawings with blue wash. The following institutions are de-scribed: the Augustinian monastery in the mindere Stadt (smaller city) of Zurich, the Franciscan monastery of the grosse Stadt (larger city) of Zurich, the Dominican monastery, the community of Beguines of St. Verena, and the Convent of St. Mary Magdalene in Oetenbach. (sol)

Online Since: 06/22/2017

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Porrentruy, Archives cantonales jurassiennes, 187 J 35e
Parchment · 189 ff. · 24.5 x 17 cm · diocese of Besançon · 1st half of the 14th century
Besançon Breviary

This breviary, which contains only the winter part, is dated to the first half of the 14th century. It is from the diocese of Besançon (with which Porrentruy was also affiliated), as indicated by certain saints that appear in the litanies, such as St. Ferreolus or St. Germanus, the responsories for the Sundays of Advent, as well as the Holy Triduum. (gle)

Online Since: 06/22/2017

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St. Gallen, Stiftsarchiv (Abtei Pfäfers), Cod. Fab. XXIV
Paper · 190 ff. · 33.5 x 20 cm · end of the 16th-beginning of the 17th century
Hans Ardüser

Ardüser’s notes begin in the year 1572 and end in 1614. His chronicle is considered an important source of political and social life in the "Alt Fry Rätien" of the time. Not until the 1870s was Hans Ardüser’s chronicle discovered and published by cantonal high school principal J. Bott from Grisons. A large part of the chronicle consists of reports about political events at the end of the 16th and the beginning of the 17th century. In his work Ardüser also mentions crimes and the execution of witches; among other things he reports about extraordinary weather events and consequent crop failures. From his autobiographical nots, which are recorded in the "Rätische Chronik" (Raetian chronicle) as well, it becomes clear that Ardüser was a gifted reader. We can conclude that he obtained his knowledge about all of these topics from written sources such as parish registers, circulating news bulletins, official publications and personal contacts to officials, returning mercenary soldiers or traveling merchants. (jan)

Online Since: 06/22/2017

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St. Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, Cod. Sang. 1002
Paper · 483 pp. · 15 x 11 cm · 15th century
Humbertus de Romanis, De tribus votis substantialibus religionis in German. Jan van Ruusbroec, Brulocht in the Upper German tradition

This manuscript, which features two ownership notes from the community of sisters of St. Georgen above St. Gall (probably from the period around 1500) on p. 3, contains two spiritual texts from the 13th and 14th century, respectively. They are a translation into German of instructions regarding the Rule of his Order by Humbert of Romans, Master General of the Dominican Order († 1277) (pp. 5295), and an Upper German version of the work Die geistliche Hochzeit (Brulocht) by the Flemish theologian Jan von Ruusbroec († 1381) (pp. 296482). (smu)

Online Since: 06/22/2017

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Zürich, Braginsky Collection, B316
Parchment · 1 f. · 18.5 x 12.1 cm · Vienna, copied by Aaron Wolf Herlingen · 1751
Septem Psalmi Poenitentiales and Ps. 138

This calligram depicting King David playing a harp comprises the Latin text of what is known as the Seven Penitential Psalms (6, 31, 37, 50, 101, 129 and 142) and of Psalm 138. The calligram is signed by the well-known Jewish scribe-artist Aaron Wolf Herlingen, the creator of the Haggadah from 1725 (B284) in the Braginsky Collection. The artist used a technique in which text is written in miniscule letters, also known as micrography. Herlingen wrote this calligram for Prince Joseph II (1741-1790), the son of Empress Maria Theresa and Emperor Francis I. (red)

Online Since: 12/20/2016

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Zürich, Braginsky Collection, K21
Parchment · 1 f. · 66.6 x 56.7 cm · Gibraltar · 1822
Ketubah (כתובה), Gibraltar, 4 Tevet 5583 (December 18, 1822)

At the time this ketubah was produced, most of the Gibraltar’s retail trade was conducted by the local Sephardic community; many of its members came from the adjacent parts of North Africa. The present Gibraltar contract belongs to an early period of local ketubah decoration, although some of its features foretell later developments. The upper section depicts a pair of lions crouched back-to-back, overlaid with circles containing the abbreviated Ten Commandments. The composition is reminiscent of the top of Torah arks, and indeed it is topped with a crown, intended as a Torah Crown. The crouching lions are flanked by vases of flowers. In the side borders, beneath theatrical drapery and trumpets suspended from ribbons, fanciful column bases are surmounted by urns. Several elements in the marriage contract are characteristic of Gibraltar ketubot. The initial word of the wedding day, Wednesday, as was common, is enlarged and ornamented. Also typical of Gibraltar is the ornamental Latin monogram at bottom center. Comprising the letters SJB, it refers to the bridal couple’s first (Solomon, Judith) and last (Benoleil) initials. (red)

Online Since: 03/22/2017

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Zürich, Braginsky Collection, K29
Parchment · 1 f. · 80.8 x 54.3 cm · Ancona · 1789
Ketubah (כתובה), Ancona, 14 Tishri 5550 (October 4, 1789)

This marriage contract was made in one of the most important Jewish communities of Italy, the Adriatic seaport of Ancona, which also was a leading center of ketubbah illustrations. The main episode at top center, depicts the prophet Elijah ascending to heaven, riding in his fiery horse-drawn chariot, while his amazed disciple, Elisha, watches below. This scene thus refers to the bridegroom’s first name Elia. The other two biblical episodes appear in the cartouches at the center of each of the side borders. At right, the scene of the Triumph of Mordecai, refers to the second name of the bridegroom, Mordecai. Depicted at left is the scene of David holding the head of Goliath; it is to be understood as a reference to the bride’s father, David Camerino. (red)

Online Since: 03/22/2017

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Zürich, Braginsky Collection, K37
Parchment · 1 f. · 40.3 x 33.3 cm · Amsterdam · 1668
Ketubah (כתובה), Amsterdam, 2 Nisan 5428 (14 March 1668)

The practice of decorating marriage contracts was revived in early seventeenth-century Amsterdam under the influence of Italian ketubah artists. In the late 1640s, the well-known Jewish engraver Shalom Italia created a copper engraving for ketubot of the Spanish-Portuguese community, which subsequently inspired an anonymous local artist to create a new modified version of this border, present in this Braginsky Collection ketubah of 1668. For more than two hundred years this border adorned Sephardic ketubot produced in Hamburg, Bayonne, London, New York and Curaçao.The calligraphic text commemorates the marriage of a known Sephardic physician, Daniel Tzemah Aboab. (red)

Online Since: 03/22/2017

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Zürich, Braginsky Collection, K40
Parchment · 1 f. · 69.2 x 46 cm · Ancona · 1795
Ketubah (כתובה), Ancona, 13 Adar 5555 (4 March 1795)

This decorated ketubah, as well as Braginsky Collection K29 produced just six years earlier, represent the height of ketubah illustration in Ancona. The text of this ketubah is centered under the arch supported by a pair of ornamental columns. While arches were commonly used as framing devices in ketubah decorations since the earliest known ketubot from the Cairo Genizah, the gold letters inscribed here against the blue spandrels provide an additional meaning. The six square Hebrew letters, an acronym for Psalms 118:20: “This is the gate of the Lord, through which the righteous may enter”, signify that the bridal couple is symbolically passing through the heavenly gate into a sanctified stage in their life. A depiction of the sacrifice of Isaac, an allusion to the bridegroom whose second name is Isaac, is located in a cartouche at the top center. This scene, a symbol of faithfulness and messianic promise that appears on many italian ketubot, has been the most popular biblical story in Jewish art over the ages. The female figure beneath has not been identified so far. (red)

Online Since: 03/22/2017

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Zürich, Braginsky Collection, K41
Parchment · 1 f. · 74 x 45.8 cm · Rome · 1798
Ketubah (כתובה), Rome, 22 Sivan 5558 (6 June 1798)

The ornamentation of this ketubah, which commemorates a wedding between two important families of the Roman ghetto, Toscano and Di Segni, reflects the golden age of ketubah decoration in Rome. The decorative frame is divided into inner and outer borders. Panels adorned with flowers on painted gold fields flank the sides of the text. In the outer frames, crisscrossed micrographic inscriptions form diamond-shaped spaces, each of which contains a large flower. The design in the inner and the outer frames are surrounded by minuscule square Hebrew letters, presenting the entire four chapters of the book of Ruth. (red)

Online Since: 03/22/2017

Documents: 25, displayed: 1 - 20