Documents: 114, displayed: 81 - 100

Sub-project: Treasures from small collections

January 2013

Status: In progress

Financed by: swissuniversities

Description: The majority of Swiss manuscripts is held in larger collections, mostly in public and ecclesiastical institutions. It is easy to forget that some of the most important sources shaping the identity of Switzerland are found in collections that hold only a few manuscripts. e-codices has taken it upon itself to provide digital access to these important treasures from small collections, the originals of which are often not available to the general public.

All Libraries and Collections

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Schlatt, Eisenbibliothek, Mss 30
Parchment · 2 + 102 + 2 pp. · 20 x 16 cm · about 1700
Belli Esperimenti Sopra li Metalli e Minerali Scritti e Mandati Alla Maesta Cesarea del Imperatore Leopoldo Da Giouanni Baptista Coene Di Passauia Pho.

This paper manuscript, produced around 1700, mentions in its title Emperor Leopold (I, reigned 1658-1705). The identity of Giovanni Baptista Coene from Passau, named as author, remains obscure; no further information is available about him. — The names of metals and other materials that Coene used in experiments are not written out in the text, but are represented by alchemic symbols (planetary signs, etc.). Because these occur in large numbers, the text is not easily readable or understandable. Further evidence that the manuscript is rooted in alchemy comes from the fact that Coene refers to Paracelsus (1493/94-1541), e.g., in the short final chapter with the title “Che cosa il Balsamo Samech di Paracelso” (pp. 101-102). Coene also mentions the “Testamentum” (pp. 99-100) and names Raimundus Lullus (1232/33-1315/16) as its author; today it is considered a pseudo-Llull text. — Within the chapters, individual paragraphs are numbered, but in the last quarter of the manuscript this numbering seems to have been added later (pp. 81-102). At the end of the manuscript, the numbering is incorrect (instead from p. 70ff. it should read correctly p. 97ff.). — The manuscripts was purchased in Italy in 1952. (ruh)

Online Since: 10/08/2015

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Schlatt, Eisenbibliothek, Mss 38
Paper · 1 + 444 + 1 pp. · 17 x 11 cm · 1526
Anno domini 1526 am tag fabiany vn[d] Sebastiany ayn liblichs piechel angefange[n] durch mych wocken pniowsky von aylem-berk obristem Sudy des margrafftum yn marhern […]

The author of this manuscript gives his name at the outset (p. 3): Wok Pňovsky von Eulenberg (Czech: Vok Pňovický ze Sovince) comes from the Moravian noble family von Eulenberg (Czech: ze Sovince), whose coat of arms is depicted in the manuscript (p. 130). Wok is documented between 1499-1531; from 1518-1525 he held the position of chief justice of Moravia. In 1526 with this manuscript he produced an early exemplar of a “Probierbuch” (assay book), which treats several procedures for analyzing and further processing various ores and metals. The first part of the manuscript is divided into 40 chapters (pp. 4-130); in the second part of the manuscript, the sections are not numbered (pp. 133-420). Added at the end is a later (17th century?) table of contents (pp. 429-444), which offers short summaries of the chapters. Assaying was of great importance to the practice of early modern mining and metallurgy. Near Eulenburg castle (Czech: hrad Sovinec), the ancestral home of the family in Northern Moravia, Wok himself was engaged in the mining of precious metals (Papajík 2005, pp. 198-200). In Wok, therefore, the mining entrepreneur and the assayer coincided in one person. Before 1924 the manuscript was part of the holdings of the library of the museum of the ‘Gymnasium’ or preparatory school (Czech: Knihovna gymnazijního muzea) in Troppau (Czech: Opava), a predecessor institution of the present library of the Silesian Museum (Czech: Knihovna Slezského zemského muzea). The manuscript has been lost since 1924. After a devastating fire in the spring of 1945, in which all accession books were destroyed, no documentation about the manuscript exists in the museum library today (information from 07-16-2015). David Papajík summarizes the current state of Czech research: “Vok also addresses theoretical aspects of mining. In 1526 he authored an extensive German language work of 420 pages on the topic, which, while it survived until the recent past and was held in the library of the museum of Opava, it was lost by 1924. We only know a description from 1881, produced by Josef Zukal. It is a great pity that this unique document about the understanding of mining of that time, has not survived into the present” (Papajík 2005, p. 200). The above-mentioned description from 1881 offers the following additional information “«Ms. chart. sec. XVI. Kl. Oct. bound in black leather without decoration, 420 pages […]. Mining flourished in the area of Eulenburg in the 15th and 16th century; thus the present work owes its creation to practical need. Without doubt it is Wok’s original manuscript and offers an interesting insight into the state of metallurgy of the time. The index in a different hand was added at a much later time; this fact as well as the great wear indicate that the book was in use for a long time (Zukal 1881, p. 15 f.). The manuscript was purchased in New York in 1955. (ruh)

Online Since: 03/17/2016

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Schlatt, Eisenbibliothek, Mss 57
Paper · 24 ff. · 48 x 34 cm · 1802
Prozhekt mosta chrez reku Nevu dlja udobnosti prokhozhdenija su-dov vo vsjakoe vremja 1802 [transcription].

This large-format manuscript (the translation of the Russian title is “Bridge-building project across the Neva River to accommodate the passage of ships at all times, 1802”) presents a bridge-building project across the Neva River in St. Petersburg. Following the title page with a decorative frame in a gray color wash (fol. 2) and the table of contents (fol. 3), there are twelve panels of watercolored drawings that give an overview and a detailed view of the project. Seven illustrations are two-sided, one of them has a fold-out page. All texts in this manuscript are in Russian and in Cyrillic script. — The bridge was designed by Charles Baird (1766–1843), a Scottish engineer who had set up a business for metal casting, machine construction and shipbuilding in St. Petersburg and who had built a cast-iron bridge nearby in 1805/06. The manuscript’s bridge project, however, calls for a combination of a floating bridge and a drawbridge: the floating bridge, resting on pontoons, splits into two branches, which end in two drawbridges near the shore (fol. 4a-5), so that it is possible to cross the bridge even while a ship passes beneath it. Other panels show, for example, the lifting mechanism hidden in the pillars (fol. 14a, 16, 17) and one of the boat-like pontoons anchored in the bed of the Neva River (fol. 20a-21). – The manuscript was purchased in Copenhagen in 1978. (ruh)

Online Since: 10/08/2015

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Sils / Segl Maria, Dorfarchiv Sils i.E. / Segl, Bücher Nr. III
Paper · 568 pp. · 30 x 19.5 cm · 1591-1652
Aestimum Vicinitatis Selӱ

This manuscript contains the complete statutes of the community of Sils i.E. from 1591, 1601, 1606, 1617, 1621 and 1626. The corrections and additions to the statutes for the year 1596 were integrated into the statutes for the year 1591, those for the year 1611 were integrated into the statutes for 1606, and those for the years 1631 and 1636 were added on several pages to the statutes of 1626. After each statute, there is a list of property appraisals. The manuscript also contains the community’s annual statement of accounts for 1606-1651, as well as other resolutions of the municipal assembly. (dar)

Online Since: 03/22/2018

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St. Gallen, Stadtarchiv der Ortsbürgergemeinde St. Gallen, StadtASG, Altes Archiv, Bd. 677a
Paper · XXXVIII + 480 + 41 pp. · 43 x 28.5 cm · 1549
Joachim von Watt (Vadian), Kleinere Chronik der Äbte des Klosters St. Gallen

The impulse for writing the original model of this text, Vadian’s “Kleinere Chronik der Äbte” (1544-46) (VadSlg Ms. 44), came from Heinrich Bullinger and Johannes Stumpf; they wanted to make use of Vadian’s knowledge of the history of St. Gall for the Eidgenössische Chronik (1547/48) that appeared under Stumpf’s name. The chronicle consists of three parts: the first part is about Saint Gall; the second part is a history of the monastery and of the city of St. Gall; the third part gives a historical-topographical description of the city of St. Gall and of Lake Constance. Wolfgang Fechter produced two copies thereof in 1549. The illustrations are by Caspar Hagenbuch. (gug)

Online Since: 12/14/2018

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Tesserete, Archivio parrocchiale, codice 1
Parchment · III + 190 pp. · 31.5 x 22.5 cm · Northern Italy (Milan) · 1342
Epistolarium ambrosianum

This manuscript, as yet almost unknown, contains an epistolary following the Ambrosian Rite. It was commissioned in 1342 by the priest Giacomo de Parazo for a church dedicated to St. Fermo not further identified. This manuscript probably reached Tesserete (Canton of Ticino), an area where the Ambrosian Rite was used, in the 15th/16th century; here it was taken apart and rebound, at which time was added a copy of a testament of dubious authenticity written in 1078 by Contessa from the city of Milan for the benefit of the church of S. Stefano in Tesserete. In the 17th century, the manuscript was the property of the Verdoni family of notaries; since the 20th century, it has been held by the parish of Tesserete. On the initial page, St. Ambrose, the patron saint of the diocese of Milan, is represented in an illuminated initial. (ber)

Online Since: 12/14/2017

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Torre, Archivio parrocchiale, s. n. (on long-term loan in Lottigna, Museo storico della Valle di Blenio)
Parchment · 32 ff. · 20.9 x 15.5 cm · Torre · 1568-1593
"Martirologio-inventario" of the Church of S. Stefano in Torre, 1568

This martirologio-inventario (an annal followed by an inventory of property) of the Church of S. Stefano in Torre in the Blenio Valley in Ticino, was written in 1568 at the request of the vicini (the original members of the municipal corporate body) of Torre and Grumo, in order to replace the older version. It contains the list of annuali, i.e., of the annual celebrations for the death days of deceased members of the Church, the inventory of movable and immovable property, of the monacharia and of the luminaria, that is, the requisites for illuminating the church. At the beginning of the manuscript there is a watercolor drawing of the church patron St. Stephen. (ber)

Online Since: 12/13/2013

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Torre, Archivio parrocchiale, s. n. (on long-term loan in Lottigna, Museo storico della Valle di Blenio)
Parchment · 60 ff. · 31.2 x 21 cm · Torre · 1639 (-1924)
"Martirologio-inventario" of the Church of S. Stefano in Torre, 1639

This martirologio-inventario (an annal followed by an inventory of property) of the Church of S. Stefano in Torre in the Blenio Valley inTicino, was written in 1639 at the request of the vicini (the original members of the municipal corporate body) of Torre and Grumo, in order to replace the 1569 copy, which was not up to date. It contains a description of the old church of S. Stefano before its reconstruction during the baroque period; the list of furnishings, of liturgical vestments, and of gold items in the church treasury; the list of annuali, i.e., of the annual celebrations for the death days of deceased members of the Church; and the church revenues. At the beginning of the manuscript there is a partially gilded drawing of the church patron St. Stephen. (ber)

Online Since: 12/13/2013

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Urnäsch, Gemeindearchiv Urnäsch, Fragment
Parchment · 2 ff. · 21.6 x 37 cm (Fragm. 1), 21.7 x 20 cm (Fragm. 2) · St. Gall · around 900 or 10th century
Psalterium iuxta Hebraeos (Fragment)

These are two well preserved fragments of a Psalterium iuxta Hebraeos, which were probably written in the 10th century at the monastery of St. Gall, following the model of Cod. Sang. 19. In 1963 both fragments were detached from a messenger bag; they are held in the town archive of Urnäsch (Appenzell Ausserrhoden). (sol)

Online Since: 10/08/2015

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Utopia, armarium codicum bibliophilorum, Cod. 1
Parchment · 1 + 78 ff. · 17.7 x 13.5 cm · about 1500-1520
Johann von Indersdorf: Prayers from the Ebran-Gebetbuch

A collection of German prayers, most likely copied for a lay patron ca. 1500-1520. (pal)

Online Since: 04/26/2007

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Utopia, armarium codicum bibliophilorum, Cod. 2 (Codex Pandeli)
Paper · 240 pp. · 29 x 21 cm · Cairo · 1723
The four Gospels in Arabic

According to the colophon at the end of the Gospel of John, this copy was completed by Ibrāhīm ibn Būluṣ ibn Dāwūd al-Ḥalabī in Cairo. It is written in a clear nasḫī script; the illustrations, provided by the Aleppo illustrator and icon-painter Ğirğis bin Ḥanāniyā, portray the four Evangelists, Matthew, Mark, Luke and John, as well as 43 scenes from the life of Jesus. The Arabic title, "This book is the holy, pure Gospel and the illuminating, shining light", is given at the end of the Gospel of John. This codex is currently on long-term loan from the Pandeli family to the library of St. Gall Abbey. (wid)

Online Since: 11/03/2009

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Utopia, armarium codicum bibliophilorum, Cod. 3
Parchment · 321 ff. · 12.7 x 9 cm · Brnakot (Armenia) · 1662
Armenian Hymnal- Sharaknots

This liturgical manuscript (Sharaknots or Sharakan) contains a collection of over a thousand hymns, organized into eight groups, for use in the Armenian Church. Many of these hymns were composed by prominent figures in the Armenian Church, while others are early translations from sacred hymns of the early Christian Church. The texts include Armenian khaz notation. This manuscript was written by the scribe Simeon in the year 1662 in the city of Brnakot, in the province of Siounik, an important center for liturgical manuscript production in southern Armenia. The book decoration consists of 8 headpieces, 120 ornamental and zoomorphic initials, and numerous simple red initials. The manuscript features its original Moroccan limp vellum binding with blind tooling. (ber)

Online Since: 07/04/2012

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Utopia, armarium codicum bibliophilorum, Cod. 4
Paper · 416 ff. · 13.1 x 10 cm · Awendants, Khizan in the Province Van · 1647
Armenian Hymnarium (Sharaknots)

Liturgical manuscript (Sharaknots), written by the copyist Awetis in Khizan in the province Van in the year 1647 (1096 according to the Armenian calendar). It contains 11 large miniatures and 28 miniatures in the margins, executed and signed by the painter Yovanes Gharietsi. He was one of the most fascinating artists of the late School of Vaspurakan. The manuscript is part of certain hymnals, created for private customers in the region of Lake Van and characterized by bright colors and interlace ornamentation. The manuscript features the Armenian Khaz-notation. The text contains the collection of hymns in use in the Armenian Church, in the same order as in a Hymnarium printed as a first edition in Amsterdam in the year 1664. Three more hymnals of this type, also the result of the collaboration of these two artists, are known: two in Jerusalem and one in Jerewan. Attached in the beginning and at the end are two sheets of parchment containing a part of the Proprium de Sanctis from a Latin breviary from the 13th/14th century. (ber)

Online Since: 04/23/2013

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Utopia, armarium codicum bibliophilorum, Cod. 5
Parchment · 126 ff. · 30 x 22.4 cm · second half of the 14th century
Liber bonorum et iurium Castropolae

This volume contains a collection of 213 documents from the years 1324-1327, copied by nine notaries in a tiny, very careful cursive script. The collection contains the documentation of property rights of the Castropola de Sergi, the lords of Pula (Croatia), regarding their properties in the area of Pula, in Istria and in Venice. The notarial documents are organized according to the city or location where the property was located; the place name is noted in the top margin of the first page of the section; each section contains a detailed list of properties and their associated auxiliary buildings, together with their exact locations. (tog)

Online Since: 12/20/2016

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Utopia, armarium codicum bibliophilorum, cod. 6 (JUD040)
Parchment · IV + 476 + IV ff. · 23.7 x 19 cm · Spain (Castile?) · 1st half of the 14th century
Bibel with Masora magna and Masora parva

Sephardic Bible in Hebrew, produced in the first half of the 14th century in Spain, probably in Castile. The manuscript opens and closes with Masoretic lists (ff. IIr-IXv and 463v to 466v), which, framed by illuminated borders, form “carpet pages”. The biblical text, copied into one or two columns, is accompanied by the Small and Large Masora (rules from the rabbinic tradition regarding the reading and vocalization of the sacred texts), which were written in tiny letters in the margins and in the gutters. These micrographic elements are sometimes enlivened in the lower margins of the pages (about 70 occurrences) or on all four sides of the pages (e.g., ff. 42r-43r, 461v-463r), where they form magnificent geometrical figures and interlace. The first biblical books are introduced by titles that are executed in browned gold on background fields of pink and blue with white scrollwork (f. 1v/Gn, 33v/Ex, 59v/Nb, 77v/Dt, 102v/Js, 125v/Jg). According to a note of ownership (f. 467v) dated 1367 (?), this Hebrew Bible was probably owned by David ha-Cohen Coutinho, member of a family of Portuguese marranos. In the 15th century, it was the property of Moses Abulafia, until his widow sold it, as shown by the sales contract, dated and signed in 1526 in Thessaloniki and placed in the beginning of the book (f. Ir). In the 16th century, the Bible was owned by the Talmudist and Rabbi Abraham di Boton of Thessaloniki (f. 467v). Thereafter its presence is attested in the Zaradel Synagogue of Alexandria in the 19th century (R. Gottheil, „Some Hebrew Manuscripts in Cairo“ in: Jewish Quarterly Review 17, 1905, p. 648). After the Bible entered the fine arts market, it has been in a private collection since 1996. (rou)

Online Since: 12/14/2017

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Utopia, armarium codicum bibliophilorum, Cod. 7
Paper · 476 pp. · 20 x 29 cm · 1562-1669
Cudesch da Estems (Register of appraisals and taxes) 1562-1669

Register of the assets of the inhabitants of the communities Bergün, Filisur, Latsch and Stuls, compiled by the public notary and chancellor at the time, later Landammann (magistrate) and pastor Tumesch Zeuth; it was updated about every ten years, first in German and, towards the end, also in Romansh. Its significance is not well documented; perhaps originally it served as a basis for financing the communities’ buying their freedom from the Bishop of Chur in 1537, later perhaps it served as a key for distributing the communities’ income from, among other things, the Valtellina districts, from pensions, from tariffs on goods and tolls on roads, etc. Currently this is the oldest known manuscript from Bergün; it is the property of Werner Dübendorfer of Eglisau. The book containing its continuation, probably up to 1799, has been lost. (fal)

Online Since: 12/14/2017

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Utopia, armarium codicum bibliophilorum, Cod. 8
Parchment · 4 ff. · 32 x 24 cm · after 1442 - end of the 15th century
Martin le Franc, Le Champion des Dames

This parchment fragment from Martin le Franc’s Champion des Dames (Book I, v. 3901-v. 4062 + Book II, v. 4313-v. 4470) is from the 15th century. The text corresponds to that of the Deschaux edition (1999). Carefully copied in two columns, the different stanzas of the poem are introduced by colored initials, alternating red and blue, and by champie initials. Book II opens with a decorated initial on a gold background, badly worn due to the fragment’s use as binding for a land register during the 17th century. This land register belonged to Jaques Etienne Clavel, co-ruler of Marsens, Ropraz and Brenles (fol. 2r). (rou)

Online Since: 12/14/2018

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Utopia, armarium codicum bibliophilorum, Cod. 100
Parchment · 201 ff. · 18 x 13.3 cm · Paris · around 1408-10
Book of hours from Paris

A book of hours following the liturgical custom of Rome in Latin, with a calendar in French and a selection of saints venerated in Paris. It contains 17 miniatures created in Paris around 1408/10 in the artistic circle of the Master of Boucicaut, one of the most influential illuminators of the early 15th century. The Master of the Mazarine contributed to the ornamentation, as did pseudo-Jacquemart, who belongs to an older generation of artists and whose contribution can be recognized in the famous Books of Hours of the Duke of Berry. The image of David was painted on an inserted double leaf; it can be attributed to a follower of the artist who illuminated the Breviary of John the Fearless. (ber)

Online Since: 12/20/2012

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Utopia, armarium codicum bibliophilorum, Cod. 101
Parchment · 210 ff. · 16.9 x 12.8 cm · Paris / Tours · second quarter of the 15th century / around 1490
Book of hours from Paris

A book of hours in Latin and French, written in the second quarter of the 15th century in Paris, but not illuminated until 1490 in Paris or perhaps in Tours by various artists who shared the work. Two miniatures as well as the decoration of the calendar and of the Office of the Dead are the work of an artist from the circle of the Maître François, a close collaborator of the Master of Jacques of Besançon, who honors Notre-Dame in a veduta of the city of Paris (f. 93r). The luminous colors and the monumental forms of the other miniatures attest to the influence of Jean Bourdichon of Tours. This artist can probably be considered responsible for the Master of the Chronique Scandaleuse, who, during the creation of this manuscript, was still working under the guidance of Jean Bourdichon. (ber)

Online Since: 12/20/2012

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Utopia, armarium codicum bibliophilorum, Cod. 102
Parchment · 248 ff. · 18 x 11.5 cm · Bourges · around 1500-1510
Book of hours of Agnès le Dieu

A book of hours following the liturgical custom of Rome, with a calendar in French. The miniatures are framed by borders decorated with plants that were executed with great botanical precision. This examplar from the late period of the French Book of hours, preserved in its entirety, was illuminated by an important master from this late phase of French book illumination. He was influenced by the Master of Claude de France und was recently identified as the Master of the Lallemant-Boethius. In the small pictures on the borders, he tries to compete with Jean Bourdichon, who introduced realistic flower borders in the marginal decoration of Anne of Brittany’s Grandes Heures and in other major works. The Master of the Lallemant-Boethius is also guided by Flemish book illumination of his time. On f. 1r one can read the name of Agnès le Dieu, the owner of the codex in the year 1605. (ber)

Online Since: 12/20/2012

Documents: 114, displayed: 81 - 100