Documents: 98, displayed: 81 - 98

Sub-project: Treasures from small collections

January 2013

Status: In progress

Financed by: swissuniversities

Description: The majority of Swiss manuscripts is held in larger collections, mostly in public and ecclesiastical institutions. It is easy to forget that some of the most important sources shaping the identity of Switzerland are found in collections that hold only a few manuscripts. e-codices has taken it upon itself to provide digital access to these important treasures from small collections, the originals of which are often not available to the general public.

All Libraries and Collections

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Utopia, armarium codicum bibliophilorum, cod. 6 (JUD040)
Parchment · IV + 476 + IV ff. · 23.7 x 19 cm · Spain (Castile?) · 1st half of the 14th century
Bibel with Masora magna and Masora parva

Sephardic Bible in Hebrew, produced in the first half of the 14th century in Spain, probably in Castile. The manuscript opens and closes with Masoretic lists (ff. IIr-IXv and 463v to 466v), which, framed by illuminated borders, form “carpet pages”. The biblical text, copied into one or two columns, is accompanied by the Small and Large Masora (rules from the rabbinic tradition regarding the reading and vocalization of the sacred texts), which were written in tiny letters in the margins and in the gutters. These micrographic elements are sometimes enlivened in the lower margins of the pages (about 70 occurrences) or on all four sides of the pages (e.g., ff. 42r-43r, 461v-463r), where they form magnificent geometrical figures and interlace. The first biblical books are introduced by titles that are executed in browned gold on background fields of pink and blue with white scrollwork (f. 1v/Gn, 33v/Ex, 59v/Nb, 77v/Dt, 102v/Js, 125v/Jg). According to a note of ownership (f. 467v) dated 1367 (?), this Hebrew Bible was probably owned by David ha-Cohen Coutinho, member of a family of Portuguese marranos. In the 15th century, it was the property of Moses Abulafia, until his widow sold it, as shown by the sales contract, dated and signed in 1526 in Thessaloniki and placed in the beginning of the book (f. Ir). In the 16th century, the Bible was owned by the Talmudist and Rabbi Abraham di Boton of Thessaloniki (f. 467v). Thereafter its presence is attested in the Zaradel Synagogue of Alexandria in the 19th century (R. Gottheil, „Some Hebrew Manuscripts in Cairo“ in: Jewish Quarterly Review 17, 1905, p. 648). After the Bible entered the fine arts market, it has been in a private collection since 1996. (rou)

Online Since: 12/14/2017

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Utopia, armarium codicum bibliophilorum, Cod. 7
Paper · 476 pp. · 20 x 29 cm · 1562-1669
Cudesch da Estems (Register of appraisals and taxes) 1562-1669

Register of the assets of the inhabitants of the communities Bergün, Filisur, Latsch and Stuls, compiled by the public notary and chancellor at the time, later Landammann (magistrate) and pastor Tumesch Zeuth; it was updated about every ten years, first in German and, towards the end, also in Romansh. Its significance is not well documented; perhaps originally it served as a basis for financing the communities’ buying their freedom from the Bishop of Chur in 1537, later perhaps it served as a key for distributing the communities’ income from, among other things, the Valtellina districts, from pensions, from tariffs on goods and tolls on roads, etc. Currently this is the oldest known manuscript from Bergün; it is the property of Werner Dübendorfer of Eglisau. The book containing its continuation, probably up to 1799, has been lost. (fal)

Online Since: 12/14/2017

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Utopia, armarium codicum bibliophilorum, Cod. 8
Parchment · 4 ff. · 32 x 24 cm · after 1442 - end of the 15th century
Martin le Franc, Le Champion des Dames

This parchment fragment from Martin le Franc’s Champion des Dames (Book I, v. 3901-v. 4062 + Book II, v. 4313-v. 4470) is from the 15th century. The text corresponds to that of the Deschaux edition (1999). Carefully copied in two columns, the different stanzas of the poem are introduced by colored initials, alternating red and blue, and by champie initials. Book II opens with a decorated initial on a gold background, badly worn due to the fragment’s use as binding for a land register during the 17th century. This land register belonged to Jaques Etienne Clavel, co-ruler of Marsens, Ropraz and Brenles (fol. 2r). (rou)

Online Since: 12/14/2018

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Utopia, armarium codicum bibliophilorum, Cod. 100
Parchment · 201 ff. · 18 x 13.3 cm · Paris · around 1408-10
Book of hours from Paris

A book of hours following the liturgical custom of Rome in Latin, with a calendar in French and a selection of saints venerated in Paris. It contains 17 miniatures created in Paris around 1408/10 in the artistic circle of the Master of Boucicaut, one of the most influential illuminators of the early 15th century. The Master of the Mazarine contributed to the ornamentation, as did pseudo-Jacquemart, who belongs to an older generation of artists and whose contribution can be recognized in the famous Books of Hours of the Duke of Berry. The image of David was painted on an inserted double leaf; it can be attributed to a follower of the artist who illuminated the Breviary of John the Fearless. (ber)

Online Since: 12/20/2012

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Utopia, armarium codicum bibliophilorum, Cod. 101
Parchment · 210 ff. · 16.9 x 12.8 cm · Paris / Tours · second quarter of the 15th century / around 1490
Book of hours from Paris

A book of hours in Latin and French, written in the second quarter of the 15th century in Paris, but not illuminated until 1490 in Paris or perhaps in Tours by various artists who shared the work. Two miniatures as well as the decoration of the calendar and of the Office of the Dead are the work of an artist from the circle of the Maître François, a close collaborator of the Master of Jacques of Besançon, who honors Notre-Dame in a veduta of the city of Paris (f. 93r). The luminous colors and the monumental forms of the other miniatures attest to the influence of Jean Bourdichon of Tours. This artist can probably be considered responsible for the Master of the Chronique Scandaleuse, who, during the creation of this manuscript, was still working under the guidance of Jean Bourdichon. (ber)

Online Since: 12/20/2012

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Utopia, armarium codicum bibliophilorum, Cod. 102
Parchment · 248 ff. · 18 x 11.5 cm · Bourges · around 1500-1510
Book of hours of Agnès le Dieu

A book of hours following the liturgical custom of Rome, with a calendar in French. The miniatures are framed by borders decorated with plants that were executed with great botanical precision. This examplar from the late period of the French Book of hours, preserved in its entirety, was illuminated by an important master from this late phase of French book illumination. He was influenced by the Master of Claude de France und was recently identified as the Master of the Lallemant-Boethius. In the small pictures on the borders, he tries to compete with Jean Bourdichon, who introduced realistic flower borders in the marginal decoration of Anne of Brittany’s Grandes Heures and in other major works. The Master of the Lallemant-Boethius is also guided by Flemish book illumination of his time. On f. 1r one can read the name of Agnès le Dieu, the owner of the codex in the year 1605. (ber)

Online Since: 12/20/2012

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Utopia, armarium codicum bibliophilorum, Cod. 103
Parchment · 179 ff. · 14.5 x 8.5 cm · Dijon · 1524
Book of hours of Bénigne Serre

A book of hours following the liturgical custom of Rome, with a calendar containing a selection of saints for Langres. The manuscript was illuminated and dated in 1524 by a Master of Bénigne Serre, who was known by the name of his client, a highly-ranked official of the King of Burgundy. The artist was a hitherto unknown illuminator from the circle of the “1520s The Hours Workshop,” which framed the miniatures with Renaissance architecture or added naturalistic flowers and animals to borders. This manuscript contains a number of unusual images, e.g., for the Lauds of the Office of the Virgin, the meeting of Joachim and Anna at the city gate of Jerusalem replaces the usual image of the Visitation. In the 18th century, the manuscript was owned by the family Bretagne of Dijon, whose family members wrote a „Livre de raison“ on several appended pages. (ber)

Online Since: 12/20/2012

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Utopia, armarium codicum bibliophilorum, Cod. 104
Parchment · 181 ff. · 19.2 x 13.3 cm · between Tournai and The Hague · around 1440/50
Book of hours of the Ladies of Oudenaarde

Two artists, active around 1440/50, contributed to the decorations of this book of hours: the older one, who created only the three miniatures on f. 13v, 105v and 140v, is part of the “Goldrankenstil,” while the younger one is characterized by greater physicality and more vibrant coloring because he was influenced by the innovations of the contemporary painting of the van Eyck brothers. This second artist is responsible for the completion of the Turin-Milan Hours in the year 1440 and also contributed to the Llangattock Book of hours. In 1813 the manuscript was given to the prioress of the Cloister of the Bernardine Sisters of Oudenaarde by the Prince of Broglie. (ber)

Online Since: 12/20/2012

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Utopia, armarium codicum bibliophilorum, Cod. 105
Parchment · 172 ff. · 13.2 x 8.8 cm · Poitiers · 1450-60
Book of hours for the use of Rome

A book of hours following the liturgical custom of Rome, with a calendar for the use in Poitiers. All main miniatures are by the Master of Poitiers 30, whose name is derived from two of the miniatures he created in a missal for use in Poitiers, which is kept in the local city library. Earlier he was known by the name Master of Adelaide of Savoy, for whom he created the book of hours Ms. 76 in the Condé Museum in Chantilly. He belonged to the circle of the Master of Jouvenel des Ursins, but was most active in Poitiers, where he influenced later local book illumination. (ber)

Online Since: 12/20/2012

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Utopia, armarium codicum bibliophilorum, Cod. 106
Parchment · 307 ff. · 18.7 x 12.8 cm · Paris · 1458-60
Book of hours from Paris

A latin book of hours with calendar, containing a selection of saints for Paris as well as several French prayers. At the end of the book, there are tables for the changing holidays beginning with the year 1640; thus it can be assumed that the manuscript was completet around this time. The majority of the miniatures are by the Master of Coëtivy, who presumably also created all compositions and thus also the preliminary drawings. The hand of a second illuminator, who can be identified as the Master of Dreux Budé, is found in the faces of Mary in the image of the birth of Jesus (f. 83v), the Adoration of the Magi (f. 92v) and the Coronation of the Virgin (f. 107r). (ber)

Online Since: 12/20/2012

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Utopia, armarium codicum bibliophilorum, Cod. 107
Parchment · 152 ff. · 20 x 14.3 cm · Paris · around 1390/1405
Psalter with calendar, litany, and Office of the Dead

The manuscript contains a psalter for use in Evreux, episcopal city and preferred residence of the kings of Navarre.This is a liturgical book which contains the calendar, the litany and the Office of the Dead, that is, the most important texts of a book of hours. The illumination is the work of an artist who was active in Paris around 1400 and who depicts elegant figures in a picturesque landscape, still on a gold background, while his color palette is already that of the 15th century. This hand is to be attributed to the workshop of the Parisian Josephus-Master. At least two miniatures – the jester miniature (f. 44r) and the miniature of the Office of the Dead (f. 131r) – are attributed to the pseudo-Jacquemart. (ber)

Online Since: 12/20/2012

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Utopia, armarium codicum bibliophilorum, Cod. 108
Parchment · 192 ff. · 20.7 x 14 cm · Paris · around 1410
Book of hours from Paris

This book of hours, addressed to a woman, contains an entry that can only be read in ultraviolet light (f. 27v) and that mentions a Jaquette de la Barre; she probably was part of the Parisian family of organ builders who, between 1401 and 1404, built the organ of Notre-Dame. The miniatures were created around 1410 by a leading Parisian master, who can be identified as the Master of the Mazarin. Subsequently, borders were added to the manuscript, probably by a Provençal hand. Several scenes stand out from the conventional iconographic program: instead of the penance of David, there is the glory of Christ on Judgment Day (f. 101r); instead of the Mass for the dead, there is the Raising of Lazarus (f. 141r); also unusual is the depiction of the prayer of St. Jerome (f. 139v) in the full vestments of a cardinal. (ber)

Online Since: 12/20/2012

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Utopia, armarium codicum bibliophilorum, Cod. 109
Parchment · 186 ff. · 18.1 x 13.5 cm · Angers · around 1429/30
Book of hours for the use of Angers

Various artists contributed to the illumination of this book of hours. Some simple miniatures are the work of an artist who trained in the circle of the Master of John the Fearless. Many faces of Mary were created by the Master of Marguerite of Orléans, an important book illuminator around 1430. In the 15th century, the manuscript belonged to Guillaume Prevost, as attested by the baptismal entries written in the “Livre de raison” (f. 186v). (ber)

Online Since: 12/20/2012

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Utopia, armarium codicum bibliophilorum, Cod. 110
Parchment · 149 ff. · 18 x 12.5 cm · Paris · around 1495-98
Book of hours by the Master of Charles VIII – possibly a supplement to Utopia Cod. 111

In addition to the unusual book for King Charles VIII described in Utopia Cod. 111, there is another book of hours that was painted by the same artist. Its border decoration remained incomplete, and all the large images follow not the usual canon of images for books of hours, but instead depict unconventional motifs. What strikes the eye in both manuscripts is the motif of the family tree of Adam, which creates an optical link between the volumes and which is not found in other of the book decorator’s manuscripts. The almost identical mass of foliage also suggests that the two volumes could belong together, produced for the king at a certain time interval from one another. The premature and unexpected death of Charles VIII after his accident at the Château d’Amboise may explain why the second manuscript was never completed. (net)

Online Since: 10/13/2016

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Utopia, armarium codicum bibliophilorum, Cod. 111
Parchment · 107 + 8 + 8 ff. · 18.2 x 12.5 cm · Paris · about 1488
Book of Hours of King Charles VIII

This book of hours was a present from the Parisian publisher Anthoine Vérard to the French King Charles VIII (1470-1498). The monarch was one of the most important figures for the French book trade from 1480 on. His collecting is inextricably linked with the luxurious printed materials of the bookseller and publisher Anthoine Vérard. Especially remarkable are the borders: the margins of all pages are decorated with a pictorial narrative of eight consecutive images showing events from the Old and New Testament. Also noteworthy is the didactic value of this book of hours, since each pair of images has a commentary of several explanatory verses in Middle French. Stylistically this book is closely related to Cod. 110, which was probably also created for the king and was by the same artist. (net)

Online Since: 10/13/2016

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Vevey, Musée historique de Vevey, Inv. Nr. 1346
Parchment · 360 pp. · 59-59.5 x 41-41.5 cm · Bern, St. Vincent · around 1489/1490
Antiphonarium lausannense, pars hiemalis (vol. I)

This volume is part of an antiphonary in three volumes that was produced in duplicate for the liturgy of Bern’s Collegiate Church of St. Vincent, founded in 1484/85. The manuscript contains the entire winter portion of the Temporale, of the Sanctorale and of the Commune Sanctorum according to the liturgy of the Diocese of Lausanne. This volume is the duplicate of volume I‬, today held in the Catholic parish Saint-Laurent in Estavayer-le-Lac. Originally the volume was decorated with eight initials, of which only two remain (p. 71 and p. 429); they are attributed to the illuminator and copyist Konrad Blochinger, who also added corrections and annotations of the text to the other volumes of this group. After the introduction of the Reformation in the year 1528 and the subsequent secularization of the chapter, the entire group of antiphonaries was sold: four were sold to the city of Estavayer-le-Lac and were used there for the liturgy of the Collegiate Church of St. Lorenz; the other two — including this manuscript — reached Vevey under circumstances that remain unexplained. They are currently held in the historical museum there. (ber)

Online Since: 06/25/2015

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Vevey, Musée historique de Vevey, Inv. Nr. 1347
Parchment · 2 + 299 + 2 pp. · 59 x 40 cm · Bern, St. Vincent · around 1489/1490
Antiphonarium lausannense, pars aestiva, de Sanctis (vol. II)

This volume is part of an antiphonary in three volumes that was produced in duplicate for the liturgy of Bern's Collegiate Church of St. Vincent, founded in 1484/85. It contains the Proprium de sanctis and the Commune Sanctorum of the summer portion (March 25 to November 25) according to the liturgy of the Diocese of Lausanne. This volume is the duplicate of volume II‬, today held in the Catholic parish Saint-Laurent in Estavayer-le-Lac. The three miniatures (p. 207, p. 271 and p. 397) that still adorn this volume are attributed to an itinerant artist who was active in Switzerland — in Fribourg, Bern, and Sion —, and afterwards in Piedmont and in the Aosta Valley. He is known by the names Master of the Breviary of Jost von Silenen and Miniaturist of Georges de Challant. After the introduction of the Reformation in the year 1528 and the subsequent secularization of the chapter, the entire group of antiphonaries was sold: four were sold to the city of Estavayer-le-Lac and were used there for the liturgy of the Collegiate Church of St. Lorenz; the other two — including this manuscript — reached Vevey under circumstances that remain unexplained. They are currently held in the historical museum there. (ber)

Online Since: 12/20/2016

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Wädenswil, Dokumentationsstelle Oberer Zürichsee, LC 11
Paper · 638 pp. · 40.5 x 25 cm · Wädenswil · 1797-1855
Chronicle of the Wädenswil reading society, Volume 1

Beginning in 1797, the Wädenswil reading society, which was founded in 1790, kept a handwritten annal that chronicled all local events of any given year. A member of the society would be designated as chronicler, who had the task of describing, by the end of the year, all events in Wädenswil that, from his point of view, were of importance. Detailed obituaries of individual personages are contained in the chronicle. For most years, it also includes descriptions of the weather, statistics regarding the population and an overview of food prices. In addition to local events, it also touches on cantonal and federal issues (among them the Bocken War, the Ustertag, the Sonderbund War). The chronicle was handwritten until 1886; the handwritten part consists of two volumes in folio-format. Later volumes consist of pasted newspaper clippings (1890 until 1945) and of typed pages, bound by year (1948-1974). The two volumes for the period from 1797 to 1886 are considered one of the most important sources for the history of Wädenswil in the 19th century. (scr)

Online Since: 12/17/2015

Documents: 98, displayed: 81 - 98