Select manuscript from this collection: B26  B243 Vol. 4 B250  S58  27/80
Country of Location:
Country of Location
Switzerland
Location:
Location
Zürich
Library / Collection:
Library / Collection
Braginsky Collection
Shelfmark:
Shelfmark
B247
Manuscript Title:
Manuscript Title
Evronot ("Rules for Calculation of the Calendar")
Caption:
Caption
Paper · 70 ff. · 18 x 13 cm · [Germany] · ca. 1670-1671
Language:
Language
Hebrew
Manuscript Summary:
Manuscript Summary
This manuscript contains an Evronot ("Rules for Calculation of the Calendar"). Many so-called Sifre evoronot ("Books of calculation") emerged in the 17th and 18th centuries. They can be taken as a reaction to the Gregorian calendar, introduced in 1582. Such manuscripts often depict the biblical Issachar, one of Jacob’s sons, on or near a ladder; as an attribute, he holds an hourglass in his hand. This manuscript has two such miniatures; above the first of which there is also an illustration of a waning and a waxing moon with a human face and stars. The title page depicts an ornamental architectural arch. At the end of the book, there is the familiar motif of Moses seated at a table holding the Tablets of the Law. (red)
DOI (Digital Object Identifier):
DOI (Digital Object Identifier
10.5076/e-codices-bc-b-0247 (http://dx.doi.org/10.5076/e-codices-bc-b-0247)
Permanent link:
Permanent link
http://e-codices.unifr.ch/en/list/one/bc/b-0247
IIIF Manifest URL:
IIIF Manifest URL
IIIF Drag-n-drop http://e-codices.unifr.ch/metadata/iiif/bc-b-0247/manifest.json
How to quote:
How to quote
Zürich, Braginsky Collection, B247: Evronot ("Rules for Calculation of the Calendar") (http://e-codices.unifr.ch/en/list/one/bc/b-0247).
Online Since:
Online Since
03/19/2015
External resources:
External resources
Rights:
Rights
Images:
(Concerning all other rights see each manuscript description and our Terms of use)
Annotation Tool - Log in

e-codices · 01/20/2015, 09:17:22

Die Kalenderreform Papst Gregors XIII. im Oktober 1582 löste bei den Juden eine erhöhte Aufmerksamkeit für ihr eigenes System der Kalenderberechnung aus. In der aschkenasischen Welt herrschte dabei das Bewusstsein vor, das dem christlichen überlegene System zu besitzen.
Aus dem 17. und 18. Jahrhundert ist eine Reihe von handschriftlichen Sifre ewronot («Bücher der Kalkulationen») bekannt, von denen einige mit Illustrationen versehen sind. Nicht selten zeigen diese einen Mann vor oder auf einer himmelwärts gerichteten Leiter. Dieser Mann, oft mit einem Stundenglas in der Hand, repräsentiert den biblischen Issachar, einen der Söhne Jakobs. Denn in 1 Chronik 12:32 heisst es: «Die Söhne Issachars, die sich auf die [Berechnung der] Zeit verstanden». Das Manuskript der Braginsky Collection ist das einzige bekannte Exemplar, das zwei Versionen dieses Motivs zeigt. In beiden hält Issachar das Stundenglas und steht auf einer Leiter, die jeweils an ein ungewöhnliches architektonisches Gebilde gelehnt ist. Die erste Illustration zeigt – den Darstellungen in anderen Sifre ewronot ähnlich – auch Abbildungen des abnehmenden und zunehmenden Mondes mit menschlichem Gesicht und umgeben von Sternen.
Die Eröffnungsseite der Handschrift weist einen ornamentalen Architekturbogen auf, ein in hebräischen Handschriften und Büchern sehr übliches dekoratives Eingangsmotiv, das hier aber sozusagen als Portal zu den himmlischen Sphären zu interpretieren ist. Im Bogen steht nur ein einziges Wort, ziwwa («Er [Gott] befahl»), wurde doch die Berechnung des Kalenders von Autoren und Schreibern als Erfüllung eines religiösen Gebots betrachtet. In diesem Manuskript tauchen zwar noch weitere grafische Ornamente auf, aber nur eine andere figürliche Illustration. Sie zeigt Moses, wie er mit den Zehn-Gebote-Tafeln an einem Tisch sitzt. Auch dieses Moses-Motiv ist aus anderen Handschriften der Sifre ewronot bekannt.

Aus: Schöne Seiten. Jüdische Schriftkultur aus der Braginsky Collection, Hrsg. von Emile Schrijver und Falk Wiesemann, Zürich 2011, S. 124.

e-codices · 01/20/2015, 09:02:53

In October 1582 Pope Gregory XIII changed the calendar of the Catholic church. Heightened awareness of calendars caused by this action, and the resultant feelings of superiority by Jews regarding their own, stimulated the production of separate books on the calculation of the Jewish calendar in the Ashkenazic world. Sifrei Evronot, or Books of Intercalations, exist, among others, in illustrated Ashkenazic manuscripts of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The understanding of the relationship between the texts and images of these owes a great deal to a recent study on the topic by Elisheva Carlebach.
A common image in Sifrei Evronot manuscripts is that of a man on a ladder, or near it, who reaches to heaven to obtain the secrets of the calendar. The man, who often holds an hourglass in his hand, is the biblical Issachar, one of Jacob’s sons. His presence may be explained by I Chronicles 12:33, where reference is made to "the Issacharites, men who knew how to interpret the signs of the times." The Braginsky manuscript is the only known example that contains two images of Issachar. His appearance in each is different, but in both he holds an hourglass in his hand and stands on a ladder that rests on an unusual structure that contains letters of the Hebrew alphabet between its columns. Whereas the text facing the first image refers to Issachar, that facing the second contains no mention of him or any other figure. The first image incorporates another common element found in Sifrei Evronot illustrations, the moon with a human face, here, again, in two variant forms.
The manuscript begins with a panel containing only the word tzivvah (He [God] commanded). The page contains a portal, intended as a gateway to the celestial spheres, but which is also typical of the architectural motifs commonly used on title pages to signify a symbolic entry into the text. By writing on the construction of the calendar, scribes believed they fulfilled a religious commandment.
In this manuscript, there are numerous other decorative elements, but only one additional illustration; it portrays Moses seated at a table holding the Tablets of the Law. Depictions of Moses appear in other Sifrei Evronot manuscripts as well. The three illustrations in the Braginsky manuscript are all flat line drawings, filled in with watercolor.

From: A Journey through Jewish Worlds. Highlights from the Braginsky collection of Hebrew manuscripts and printed books, hrsg. E. M. Cohen, S. L. Mintz, E. G. L. Schrijver, Amsterdam, 2009, p. 98.

Add an annotation
Annotation Tool - Log in

Schöne Seiten. Jüdische Schriftkultur aus der Braginsky Collection, Hrsg. von Emile Schrijver und Falk Wiesemann, Zürich 2011, S. 124-125.

A Journey through Jewish Worlds. Highlights from the Braginsky collection of Hebrew manuscripts and printed books, hrsg. E. M. Cohen, S. L. Mintz, E. G. L. Schrijver, Amsterdam, 2009, p. 98-99.

Add a bibliographical reference

Reference Images and Binding

Front cover
Front cover
Back cover
Back cover