Documents: 100, displayed: 81 - 100

Sub-project: Virtual Manuscript Library of Switzerland

January 2008 - December 2011

Status: Completed

Financed by: e-lib.ch

Description: With the financial backing of e-lib.ch (the “Swiss Electronic Library”), a total of 100 manuscripts from various Swiss Libraries has been digitized by the end of the year 2011. e-lib.ch is a joint project of the Swiss University Conference, the ETH-Board (Board of the Swiss Federal Institutes of Technology) and the Federal Office for Professional Education and Technology (OPET). This subproject has been commissioned by the Swiss Academy of Humanities and Social Sciences (SAGW).
Steering Committee: Prof. Rudolf Gschwind and Prof. Dr. Lukas Rosenthaler, Imaging and Media Lab, Universität Basel; Barbara Roth PhD, Manuscript Conservator, Bibliothèque de Genève; Heidi Eisenhut PhD, Director of the Kantonsbibliothek Appenzell Ausserrhoden, Trogen.

All Libraries and Collections

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St. Gallen, Stiftsarchiv (Abtei Pfäfers), Cod. Fab. 1
Parchment · 91 ff. · 31 x 20.5 cm · Churrätien · first quarter of the 9th century / 9th-14th centuries
Evangelistary ("Liber viventium")

The Liber viventium Fabariensis is likely the most important surviving work of Rhaetish book art. This manuscript was originally designed as an Evangelistary and richly adorned with initials, frames for canonical tables and full-page illustrations of the symbols of the four evangelists. Starting in 830 the names of monks who joined the monastic community were listed in the empty canonical table frames, together with living and deceased benefactors of the abbey. In addition to its function as evangelistary, memorial and record of the monastic brotherhood, the Liber viventium was later also used to preserve the historial records and treasure catalog of Pfäfers Abbey. Because of the legal importance of the Liber viventium up to modern times, the volume is housed in the archival collection of Pfäfers Abbey. (kur)

Online Since: 06/02/2010

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St. Gallen, Stiftsarchiv (Abtei Pfäfers), Cod. Fab. 2
Parchment · 78 ff. · 28 x 19 cm · Southwestern Germany · 1080-1090 / around 1400 / last quarter of the 15th century
Liber aureus (Evangelistary)

Liber Aureus, the Golden Book of Pfäfers, was originally produced in about 1080/90 as an Evangelistary, decorated with artistic portraits of the four evangelists. The free space left between the readings was used in the 14th century for the recording of "Weistümern" (judicial sentences). (kur)

Online Since: 06/02/2010

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St. Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, Cod. Sang. 360
Parchment · 34 pp. · 25.5 x 8 cm · St. Gall · 12th century
Hymni (XXVII) Sangallenses in processionibus

A St. Gall Processional from about 1150, carried in processions, both within the cloister itself and also around the surrounding area which now comprises the city of St. Gall; bound in a long wooden protective case to protect it from the effects of the weather. It contains hymns and litanies to be sung during processions, most of them composed by the monks of St. Gall during the 9th and 10th centuries; includes neumes. (smu)

Online Since: 12/09/2008

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St. Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, Cod. Sang. 368
Parchment · 108 ff. · 33-33.5 x 25.5 cm · Konstanz · about 1470/80
Latin Gospel readings

A volume of the Gospels, made to order for an unknown customer in about 1470/1480, possibly in the workshop of the book illustrator Rudolf Stahel of Konstanz. It contains Latin Gospel readings for the most important holy days of the church year. Illustrated by at least two artists with 21 full-page illustrations, including the symbols of the four evangelists and representations of the most important holy days throughout the year. In 1658 the volume was presented by the court official Fidel von Thurn to Abbot Gallus Alt (1654-1687) and decorated by a book illuminator with his crest. (smu)

Online Since: 12/09/2008

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St. Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, Cod. Sang. 530
Paper · VII + 140 ff. · 30.5-31 x 20.5-21 cm · 1517/1531
Organ tabulature of Fridolin Sicher

An organ tablature by the St. Gall cathedral organist and calligrapher Fridolin Sicher (1490-1546). Starting in 1512, while he was a pupil of the organist Hans Buchner in Konstanz, Sicher gathered 176 pieces by 94 composers (including Paul Hofhaimer, Hans Buchner, Jacob Obrecht, Josquin Desprez, Matthaeus Pipelaere) together in this volume. Two thirds are sacred vocal pieces, the rest are originally secular songs. The descant is in measured notation on a five line staff, while the remaining vocal parts are indicated with alphabet letters and rhythmical symbols. Some of the compositions may be found only in this particular organ book. (smu)

Online Since: 12/09/2008

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St. Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, Cod. Sang. 541
Parchment · X + 298 ff. · 56.5-57 x 35.5-36 cm · St. Gall · 1544
Fridolin Sicher, Antiphonary from the Cloister of St. Gall

This large-format antiphonary from the Cloister of St. Gall, produced in the year 1544 at the request of Abbot Diethelm Blarer (1530-1564), contains songs to be sung during the liturgy of the hours on holy days throughout the year. The scribe who wrote this volume was the cleric, cathedral organist and calligrapher Fridolin Sicher (1490-1546), the illuminator who made the 22 figured initials and the full-page double illustration at the beginning of the antiphonary is unknown. (smu)

Online Since: 12/09/2008

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St. Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, Cod. Sang. 564
Parchment · IV + 318 + IV ff. · 27.5 x 19.5 cm · 12th century
Lives of the saints of St. Gall Gallus, Otmar and Wiborada

A carefully crafted copy of the life stories of St. Gall patron saints Gallus, Otmar and Wiborada from the first half of the 12th century, written in a late Carolingian minuscule script and ornamented with several elaborately decorated oversize initials. (smu)

Online Since: 12/09/2008

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St. Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, Cod. Sang. 613
Parchment · 376 pp. · 28 x 19 cm · St. Gall · 1526
Codex Gaisbergianus

This manuscript, named after the person who commissioned it, Abbot Franz Gaisberg (abbot 1504-1529), contains assorted historiographic and hagiographic texts: a history of the abbots of St. Gall with coats of arms, epitaphs of St. Gall abbots and monks, the history of the St. Gall abbey (Casus sancti Galli) for the years 1200-1232 by Konrad von Fabaria, the anonymous Vita of Notker Balbulus († 912), together with a copy of the records of his beatification process in 1513 and the legends of saints Constantius, Minias, and Roch. The codex was written by the organist and calligrapher Fridolin Sicher of the St. Gall Abbey (1490-1546). (sno)

Online Since: 03/31/2011

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Trogen, Kantonsbibliothek Appenzell Ausserrhoden, CM Ms. 4
Parchment · 202 ff. · 17.5 x 12.5 cm · Paris · beginning of the 15th century
Book of hours from Paris

The design concept of this manuscript, both the text and the execution, typify the Parisian 'Horae' tradition of the early 15th century ('Boucicaut-Meister'). The top-level organizational elements in the book's decorative program are seven pages decorated with miniatures; multi-line colorful initials mark the secondary textual divisions. The extremely squared illustrations on the decorated pages include scenes with figures enclosed on three sides by staffs entwined by tendrils with decorative gold, red and blue thorny leaves which completely fill the broad parchment margin. Four lines of text, introduced by a large colorful initial, are inserted between the illustration and the lower decorative staff. The beginning of each of the various offices is marked with such an ornamental page. This book of hours is not only the oldest item in the Carl Meyer collection in the Cantonal Library of Appenzell Ausserrhoden, it is one of its best and most valuable items. It is not know who originally commissioned the manuscript. (eis)

Online Since: 05/20/2009

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Trogen, Kantonsbibliothek Appenzell Ausserrhoden, CM Ms. 5
Parchment · 191 ff. · 15 x 11 cm · France · first half of the 15th century
Book of hours from (eastern?) France

The layperson who commissioned this book of hours is not known by name, but left definite personal traces on the book: he had a full page portrait miniature of himself painted on Fol. 11v, kneeling and accompanied by a coat of arms. The presence of such a prominent portrait of the benefactor indicates considerable ambition on the part of the book's commissioner, who was probably a member of the merchant class. In addition, the portrait was painted by a more talented artist than the other miniatures in the manuscript, which are made in the style of woodcuts. The book of hours could have been intended for use in eastern France. Stylistically, the work displays a provincial character. (eis)

Online Since: 05/20/2009

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Trogen, Kantonsbibliothek Appenzell Ausserrhoden, CM Ms. 6
Parchment · 212 ff. · 18.5 x 13 cm · Northern France (Paris?) · middle of the 15th century
Book of hours from France

This book of hours is patterned after the liturgical format of the Parisian 'Horae'. It differs, however, in its richer, yet qualitatively narrower range of illustrations: each of the Gospel selections is accompanied by a portrait of its author, and the Marian Office by a complete cycle illustrating the childhood of Jesus. The artist's indirect reception of the originals by the well known Paris illuminator, via a series of intermediate steps, displays numerous misunderstandings or intentional revisions. To the modern eye, accustomed to modern aesthetic norms, the shallow fields, bold juxtaposition of colors, and extremely foreshortened perspective used in these illustrations come across as expressive and inventive. The commissioner of the work is unknown. (eis)

Online Since: 06/08/2009

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Trogen, Kantonsbibliothek Appenzell Ausserrhoden, CM Ms. 7
Parchment · 108 ff. · 18 x 13 cm · Lille · around 1500
Book of hours from Lille

The origin of this manuscript in the northern French-Flemish border region can be determined from its liturgical features, its leather binding with stamped designs and the inscription Robiers Plovrins as well as by a comparison with stylistically similar manuscripts. Another book of hours illustrated by the same artist is held at Claremont near Berkeley, California (USA). This exemplar is a somewhat cruder imitation of the style of scribe and book illustrator Jean Markant, who was quite popular around 1500 in Lille. The commissioner of this volume is unknown. (eis)

Online Since: 06/08/2009

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Trogen, Kantonsbibliothek Appenzell Ausserrhoden, CM Ms. 8
Parchment · 104 ff. · 14 x 7 cm · Paris · second quarter of the 16th century
Book of hours from Paris

This book of hours with a tall, narrow format is a true pocket book, and the framing of the miniatures with architectural elements, crowned volutes, putti, and garlands displays a definite Renaissance influence. The book is illustrated with 16 full-page illuminations and 21 smaller, simpler miniatures by a different artist. One of the full-page illustrations shows the coat of arms of the person who commissioned the book: he was a certain Michel de Champrond (d. August 1, 1539), Lord of Ollé, Advisor and Paymaster of the King. This would indicate that a well-to-do personage, not of noble birth, but part of the court circle, had an elaborate, richly decorated and partially customized prayer book made by a middle quality manuscript workshop as late as the 1530s, when printed Books of hours were already widely available. (eis)

Online Since: 06/08/2009

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Wil, Dominikanerinnenkloster St. Katharina, M 32
Paper · 112 ff. · 18.5 x 15 cm · St. Gall · 1543
The Rule and Constitutions of the Augustinian Order

After the city council of St. Gall ended the enclosure of the convent of Dominican sisters at St. Katharina on May 2, 1528 and the convent gradually broke up, only Regula Keller and two sisters remained in its buildings, where they continued to work throughout 1543, copying the Augustinian Rule and Constitutions. The reading of the Rule and the Constitutions was more strongly emphasized in the reformed cloisters, in keeping with the character of their religious observance. (men)

Online Since: 07/31/2009

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Wil, Dominikanerinnenkloster St. Katharina, M 41
Paper · 452 ff. · 21 x 14.5 cm · St. Gall · 1484
Otto von Passau, The twenty-four Elders

This work presents a guide to the Christian life in 24 speeches, each following a particular theme, put together using brief selections from more than 100 authors. In the late Middle Ages this was a favorite text for reading aloud at meals, especially the long and detailed life of Mary attributed to the “12th elder“, which combines the story of Christ's Passion with an account of the fate of Mary. (men)

Online Since: 07/31/2009

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Wil, Dominikanerinnenkloster St. Katharina, Chronik ("Konventsbuch")
Paper · 187 ff. · 29 x 21.5 cm · St. Gall · ca. 1481/82-1528
Chronicle ("Konventsbuch")

Formerly referred to in the reseach literature as the "Chronic" or "Chronicle", this was in truth the convent record book of the Cloister of St. Katharina in St. Gall (61r:...und sol dis also in des convents buoch gesetz werden...). The content consists of chronologically ordered entries concerning the business transactions of the convent. The manuscript was produced in the course of the reform period, as the convent was converted from private to communal ownership. Thus this convent book served as a record of the transfer of administrative authority of St. Katharina to the convent community itself and made it possible for the sisters to maintain oversight of the goods they had brought with them when they joined the convent. Records concerning building projects, decoration, scriptorium, legal conflicts and donations, entries concerning individual sisters, pastoral staff and employees as well as sporadic entries about the history of the convent were also set down in this manuscript. (rue)

Online Since: 07/31/2009

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Wil, Dominikanerinnenkloster St. Katharina, Schwesternbuch
Paper · 257/266 ff. · 31 x 23.5 cm · St. Gall · about 1480 (?)
The "Book of Sisters"

The title of this manuscript is misleading: it does not mean, as it would in formal research, a collection of short biographies of the sisters of a particular cloister written by close associates in the following generation of sisters. On closer examination, the contents of the St. Gall Book of Sisters has two parts, probably composed at the beginning of the 1480s: Part 1, fols. jr-xxiiijv (pp. 5-14r of the new pagination): digests of the history of the cloister during the years 1229-1488, with references to supporting documents. Part 2, fols. xxvir-xxxvjr: letters exchanged between the Dominican nuns of St. Gall and those of the convent of St. Katherine in Nurnberg; fols. xlviijr-CClvjr are not in letter form (without salutations and formulas of greeting, etc.), but rather are records of Nurnberg usances (financial transactions) edited in report form, grouped by themes; fols. CCLIXr-CCLXIVv: a register. (men)

Online Since: 07/31/2009

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Wil, Dominikanerinnenkloster St. Katharina, Urbar
Paper · 99 ff. · 31 x 41.5 cm · St. Gall · middle of the 15th century
Urbarium

Described in fols. Ir-lxxxjv: a catalog of properties, farms and land holdings together with information on their productivity and income generated; after fol. 84 an inserted fascicle contain an index, in a hand from about 1600, with alphabetical locators on to the right-hand edge of the spread. (men)

Online Since: 07/31/2009

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Zofingen, Stadtbibliothek, Pa 31
Paper · 136 ff. · 28 x 20 cm · Lucerne (?) · 1420s (?)
Schachzabelbuch

This manuscript of the 'chess book', an allegorical treatment of the social order based on the game of chess, originated during the 1420s, probably in Lucerne. 24 ink-wash drawings show representatives of various social positions. (red)

Online Since: 07/31/2009

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Zürich, Zentralbibliothek, Ms. Rh. hist. 27
Parchment · A + 99 ff. · 27-28 x 19-20 cm · Reichenau · early 9th century / 10th century
Codex of Fraternisation

The main portion of the manuscript Ms. Rh. hist. 27, written in the early 9th century, contains the so-called Codex of Fraternisation of Reichenau. Codices of Fraternisation contain a list of the members of the monastery's confraternities who were required to include the other living or deceased members of the confraternity into their daily prayers. The zone of influence was large, reaching from Reichenau in the South to Monteverde and Conques, from Mondsee in the East to Fulda and St. Trond in the North as well as to Jumièges in the West. Over 38.000 names are documented. The earliest entries have been continuously amended and updated for several centuries. At the end of the volume, following the Codex of Fraternisation, there are 15 leaves of parchment from the 10th-12th centuries containing lists of friars, additional names and transcriptions of charters. At the beginning of the volume there are straps glued on paper containing agreements of fraternisation and obituaries from the 14-16th centuries. (ste)

Online Since: 03/31/2011

Documents: 100, displayed: 81 - 100