Select manuscript from this collection: B26  S7 S12  S58  79/85
Country of Location:
Country of Location
Switzerland
Location:
Location
Zürich
Library / Collection:
Library / Collection
Braginsky Collection
Shelfmark:
Shelfmark
S8
Manuscript Title:
Manuscript Title
Megillat Esther (מגילת אסתר) / Esther Scroll
Caption:
Caption
Parchment · 1 f. · 8 x 88 cm · Italy · Scroll: Italy, 18th century / Case: Venice or Rome, 17th century
Language:
Language
Hebrew
Manuscript Summary:
Manuscript Summary
Jewish ceremonial objects crafted of gold, such as this Esther scroll case, are exceptionally rare since synagogue and personal Judaica objects were usually made of silver or other less precious material. The cylindrical case of this scroll is ornamented with applied filigree. Emerging from a vase at the center is a large naturalistic flowering wine with scrolling stems and blossoms that extend across the case’s decorated surface. Large blossoms support or frame the objects associated with the Holy Temple of Jerusalem. Although these motifs are frequently found on a variety of Italian Jewish ritual metalwork, they do not relate specifically to the Esther story. In addition, the Ten Tablets of the Law are placed on the largest central floral motif, a wreath composed of small flower forms that may suggest sunflowers. There are two similar Esther scroll cases of this type undoubtedly created by the same maker. They have been localized to seventeenth-century Rome or Venice. This undecorated scroll is probably from the 18th century. (red)
DOI (Digital Object Identifier):
DOI (Digital Object Identifier
10.5076/e-codices-bc-s-0008 (http://dx.doi.org/10.5076/e-codices-bc-s-0008)
Permanent link:
Permanent link
http://e-codices.unifr.ch/en/list/one/bc/s-0008
IIIF Manifest URL:
IIIF Manifest URL
IIIF Drag-n-drop http://e-codices.unifr.ch/metadata/iiif/bc-s-0008/manifest.json
How to quote:
How to quote
Zürich, Braginsky Collection, S8: Megillat Esther (מגילת אסתר) / Esther Scroll (http://e-codices.unifr.ch/en/list/one/bc/s-0008).
Online Since:
Online Since
03/22/2017
External resources:
External resources
Rights:
Rights
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e-codices · 01/25/2017, 16:16:48

Jewish ceremonial objects crafted of gold, such as this elegant Esther scroll case, are exceptionally rare. Synagogue and personal Judaica objects were usually made of silver. While several gold Jewish marriage rings are known, only a small number of larger-scale gold Judaica objects are extant. It is likely that over the generations, gold objects of Judaica were melted down for the intrinsic value of the precious metal.

This cylindrical case is ornamented with delicate applied filigree. Emerging from a vase at the center is a large naturalistic flowering vine with scrolling stems and blossoms that extend across the case’s decorated surface. Large blossoms support or frame the Temple Implements (objects associated with the Holy Temple of Jerusalem), motifs frequently found on a variety of Italian Jewish ritual metalwork. Applied Tablets of the Law are placed on the largest central floral motif, a wreath composed of small flowers with centers of granulation, forms that may suggest sunflowers. Two more floral clusters, or sunflower motifs, emerge from the same stem and support a censer and the High Priest’s mitre. Beneath the mitre, additional flower-filled vases frame a large menorah. Although the Temple Implements are Jewish symbols, the decoration does not relate specifically to the Esther story.

It is noteworthy that two almost identical Esther scroll cases of this type, undoubtedly created by the same maker, survive. Based on the employment of the Temple Implement motifs integrated into a creative and lush setting, in addition to exuberant ornamentation, they have been localized to seventeenth-century Rome. They also have been associated, however, with seventeenth-century Venice, whose goldsmiths were renowned for their exquisite filigree work. Venice was a major center for the production of Jewish ceremonial metalwork used in communities throughout the Italian peninsula and beyond.

One of the two similar cases contains a seventeenth century scroll with gilt borders and restrained ornamentation. This may be the scroll for which the case was produced, and might suggest the type of work originally made for the Braginsky Collection case, which now contains a later, undecorated scroll.

A Journey through Jewish Worlds. Highlights from the Braginsky collection of Hebrew manuscripts and printed books, hrsg. E. M. Cohen, S. L. Mintz, E. G. L. Schrijver, Amsterdam, 2009, p. 278.

e-codices · 01/25/2017, 16:15:47

Aus Gold gefertigte jüdische Kultgeräte wie diese elegante Hülse für eine Estherrolle sind ausserordentlich selten. Gegenstände für den synagogalen oder den privaten Gebrauch waren meist aus Silber oder aus Material von geringerem Wert. Man kennt jüdische Hochzeitsringe oder Amulette aus Gold, aber nur wenige grössere Objekte.
Auf den Korpus der zylindrischen Hülse sind feine Filigranornamente und -darstellungen appliziert. Aus einer Vase entwickeln sich Blütenzweige, die sich um die Geräte des Jerusalemer Tempels ranken. Diese sind zwar auch auf anderen italienischen Kultgegenständen aus Metall zu sehen, haben aber mit der Esther-Geschichte im Grunde nichts zu tun: das Räuchergefäss, die Mitra des Hohepriesters, die Menora. Die Zehn-Gebote-Tafeln erscheinen über einem grossen, an Sonnenblumen erinnernden Blütenornament.
Es sind zwei ähnliche Hülsen bekannt, die zweifellos von der Hand desselben Künstlers stammen. Sie werden ins 17. Jahrhundert datiert und entweder in Rom oder Venedig lokalisiert. Die nicht dekorierte Pergamentrolle dieser Megilla dürfte aus dem 18. Jahrhundert stammen.

Schöne Seiten. Jüdische Schriftkultur aus der Braginsky Collection, Hrsg. von Emile Schrijver und Falk Wiesemann, Zürich 2011, S. 314.

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A Journey through Jewish Worlds. Highlights from the Braginsky collection of Hebrew manuscripts and printed books, hrsg. E. M. Cohen, S. L. Mintz, E. G. L. Schrijver, Amsterdam, 2009, p. 278.

Schöne Seiten. Jüdische Schriftkultur aus der Braginsky Collection, Hrsg. von Emile Schrijver und Falk Wiesemann, Zürich 2011, S. 314.

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